Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    the

    Hi,

    I work in a discipline in which a scientist ,Greenwood, has introduced a function to describe a relationship. Some times in the articles which I read I see some authors call the function as "Greenwood's function" others "the Greenwood function". I have seen this issue elsewhere like "the Obama administration"

    Which one is correct and what is the rule for allocating or relating things to people? Is it different from the possession rules?

    Thank you very much

  1. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,458
    #2

    Re: the

    There are no solid rules about this. You have to judge by context.

    Within a single academic paper concerning the function I think "Greenwood's function" and "the Greenwood function" are identical. But in the wider literature the possibility of ambiguity grows because Greenwood may have created or contributed to more than one function.

    In your "Obama administration" example, some speakers may be content to consider his whole eight years as one administration, while more finicky people prefer to focus on the differences between his first term and his second.

    Context is everything.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #3

    Re: the

    I think that if it becomes well known (at least in that field of study), one form will become "standard." Until that time, just be consistent with what you use.

    For every "Avogardo's Number" there is a "Heaviside Cover-up Method."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #4

    Re: the

    Both appear in Google. The Wikipedia article on it is entitled the Greenwood Function.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •