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    #1

    to get off his high horse

    Hi,
    May someone explain to me what this sentence means? :
    " If a man does not already belong to the horsy set, he may rather rudely be told to get off his high horse". I suppose it has an idiomatic or figurative meaning.
    Thanks you

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to get off his high horse


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    #3

    Re: to get off his high horse

    "Horsey set" usually refers to someone who is devoted to horses, a breeder, a racer, a jumper, etc. The expression "high horse" refers to someone who is arrogant. The connection between the two is not readily apparent. Do you have more context?

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to get off his high horse

    Hm. That's funny. I've already answered this one.

    This is an expression known as a witticism, which means a clever remark.

    The horsey set is the group of rich people who breed, race, and show horses.

    To be on a high horse is to moralize loudly. Picture a general on a horse giving orders to an army.

    The quote means that people who aren't powerful are often challenged for their beliefs. It also implies that the powerful can say anything and get away with it.

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    #5

    Re: to get off his high horse

    You answered this on a different thread.

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    #6

    Re: to get off his high horse

    Since we don't seem to be getting a real context, I am inclined to think that the person on the "high horse" doesn't know much about horses, but is giving (unwelcome) advice to those who do.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to get off his high horse

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You answered this on a different thread.
    Oh. Thanks. I thought my post had gone off to the dead letter office in the sky.

    I'd like to think it's two people working on the same assignment. (But I don't.)
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 23-Aug-2014 at 20:36. Reason: Deleting '=O'. Please stop doing that, Charlie.

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    #8

    Re: to get off his high horse

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Since we don't seem to be getting a real context, I am inclined to think that the person on the "high horse" doesn't know much about horses, but is giving (unwelcome) advice to those who do.
    Since the horsey set is the rich, I'm pretty sure it's about which people get knocked off their high horses and who doesn't.

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    #9

    Re: to get off his high horse

    I know a lot of "horsey people" who aren't rich. Many have one horse and pay for lessons for a child to learn jumping or dressage.

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    #10

    Re: to get off his high horse

    Hi,
    I found the sentence in a text about people and animals, or rather about idioms relating to animals. This is the real context; "A dog howls or bays to the moon, and a bad singer does the same when he does not seem to please his audience. If a man does not already belong to the horsy set, he may rather rudely be told to get off his high horse. And how nice pony's tails look on some girls!".
    I hope it will be helpful to find out the real connection between the two expressions.
    Thanks to everyone.
    Elisa

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