Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Aug 2014
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    The phrase "Look for"

    I was trying to use "look for" in a sentence.

    "Can you look for it for me?"

    In the above sentence, i just want to use "look for" and started wondering if it is weird that is like "....look for it for me" ?

    I know there are other verbs I can use but i am just trying to make it clear in this case.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,880
    #2

    Re: The phrase "Look for"

    It is fine. There's nothing wrong with repeating prepositions if required, though you could use a different verb to avoid it.

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Aug 2014
    • Posts: 2
    #3

    Re: The phrase "Look for"

    Thanks!! I think I've picked my confidence up again!!!!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Dec 2013
    • Posts: 29
    #4

    Re: The phrase "Look for"

    Does the first "for" and the second "for" have the same connotation?.
    If not it seems it does not imply that it is a repetition.
    Am I right?.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #5

    Re: The phrase "Look for"

    Look for = search
    for me = on my behalf, for my benefit.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,880
    #6

    Re: The phrase "Look for"

    Quote Originally Posted by hm46 View Post
    Does the first "for" and the second "for" have the same connotation?.
    If not it seems it does not imply that it is a repetition.
    Am I right?.
    You're right that they're not the same, but the word is repeated.

Similar Threads

  1. Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its scenery
    By Mumuqi in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-May-2013, 16:02
  2. Why is the phrase "a place of interest" translated as "a place famous for its scener
    By Mumuqi in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-May-2013, 19:50
  3. [Vocabulary] Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?
    By eggcracker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2012, 20:51
  4. [Grammar] difference btw the "participial" and the "participle" phrase
    By okose in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2010, 12:21
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2006, 04:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •