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    #1

    may best

    One might properly consider the verb to be the most important word in a sentence, and so we may best begin our study of Latin with a look at that part of speech.

    What does "may best" mean?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: may best

    What is the source of that quotation, sitifan?

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    #3

    Re: may best

    Wheelock's Latin, 6th edition, page 1.
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: may best

    "We may best" means "It may be best for us to...".

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    #5

    Re: may best

    What's the difference between we may best and we had better?
    I need native speakers' help.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: may best

    "We had better" is stronger. It is more like an obligation than a suggestion.

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    #7

    Re: may best

    1. You'd be better going by bus.
    2. You'd better go by bus.
    What's the difference in meaning between the above two sentences?
    I need native speakers' help.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: may best

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    1. You'd be better going by bus. = You would be a better person if you took the bus. Or you'd be healthier if you took the bus.
    2. You'd better go by bus. = You should take the bus.
    What's the difference in meaning between the above two sentences?
    The first sentence isn't a good one. The second example fits what you want to say.

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    #9

    Re: may best

    not a teacher

    You can say: "You'd be better off going by bus".

    You could fly there, but you'd be better off going by bus, it's cheaper.
    It's a very long way to walk, you'd be better off going by bus.

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    #10

    Re: may best

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    The first sentence isn't a good one. The second example fits what you want to say.
    The first sentence was quoted from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. The second is my own sentence.
    http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...glish/better_1
    3 more suitable or appropriate
    Can you think of a better word than ‘nice’?
    It would be better for him to talk to his parents about his problems.
    You'd be better going by bus.
    I need native speakers' help.

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