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    #1

    Simmer down

    Hi,
    Can you explain to me the meaning of " How many times do I have to tell you to simmer down"?
    Is there same common expression to say the same thing?

    Elisa

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Simmer down

    I have told you many times to calm down. You have not calmed down. How many times will I have to tell you to calm down before you actually calm down?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Simmer down

    Grammar and usage aside, I'll just say that in my experience, having someone tell me to "calm down" usually has the opposite effect. Especially if I am not actually very excited to start with. Being told to "simmer down" probably will make me even angrier.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Simmer down

    There are, however, people who need to be told to calm down or simmer down. I have been in bars with many of them.

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    #5

    Re: Simmer down

    In other words, "simmer down" is the same that "pull yourself together" or "cool It!".
    Is that right?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Simmer down

    I agree about "Cool it" but not with "Pull yourself together".

    "Simmer down/Calm down" suggest that someone is out of control with anger or frustration. Usually, someone being told to "Pull yourself together" is very upset or sad and is having a different kind of meltdown.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Simmer down

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    There are, however, people who need to be told to calm down or simmer down. I have been in bars with many of them.
    Maybe there are better ways of telling them than, errr, telling them.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Simmer down

    It works for me.

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    #9

    Re: Simmer down

    For me "simmer down" would only be used in quite a specific situation. I imagine a teacher telling a group of children to be quiet. The other Phrasal verb to use here would be "shut up", which is of course too impolite for most situations. I think "simmer down" would be quite inappropriate if you tried to use it between adults. The person who hears this will probably understand you are calling him/her a child. I think this phrasal is just for teachers.

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    #10

    Re: Simmer down

    In my opinion no, it is appropriate to use simmer down in a conversation with another adult, there is no indication of a relationship of adult and child in the phrase.

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