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    #1

    Mary reads Englsh as fast as Paul/Paul does.

    1. Mary reads English as fast as Paul.
    2. Mary reads English as fast as Paul does.

    Hi,
    You may see there is little difference between the two above sentences. Well! I am sure they are both correct. But my question is can I use the both interchangeably? If not, when which is used?

    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Mary reads Englsh as fast as Paul/Paul does.

    You can use them both without there being any difference in meaning.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Mary reads Englsh as fast as Paul/Paul does.

    A) is probably more common than b) nowadays, but there is no difference in meaning.

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