Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Swedish
      • Home Country:
      • Sweden
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2011
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    Specific cases of "TH" sound

    Dear Friends,

    Going straight to the problem.

    When it comes to pronouncing words containing the "th" sounds separately or just one such word in a sentence, I do not have a problem with the pronunciation.

    It's when there is more words with the "th" sound and/or words which end with a letter "t" in one sentence, I'm confused.


    For example: " I need to get that thing. "

    My question is; do we keep the tongue in between the teeth all the time to pronounce the last two words, or do we actually pull it back and forth?
    If I say this sentence at a very slow pace, everything is OK slow.wma, but at a normal conversational pace, either the sounds are not very clean or I chokefast.wma.

    Any help appreciated!
    Tom

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,555
    #2

    Re: Specific cases of "TH" sound

    Quote Originally Posted by noofin View Post
    Dear Friends,

    Going straight to the problem.

    When it comes to pronouncing words containing the "th" sounds separately or just one such word in a sentence, I do not have a problem with the pronunciation.

    It's when there are more words with the "th" sound or words which end with a letter "t" in one sentence that I'm confused.


    For example: " I need to get that thing. "

    My question is; do we keep the tongue in between the teeth all the time to pronounce the last two words, or do we actually pull it back and forth?
    If I say this sentence at a very slow pace, everything is OK slow.wma, but at a normal conversational pace, either the sounds are not very clean or I choke.fast.wma.

    Any help appreciated!
    Tom
    I know it's a tongue-twister for newcomers to English. You can say the t before the th quickly, but don't skip it. The trick is that you don't have to blow out on the t. Just touching your tongue to the top of your mouth is enough.

    If you said "ge' tha' thing," you'd sound drunk or poorly educated. If you said "get 'at 'ing," you'd sound like you'd been to the dentist. So every part of the phrase needs to be pronounced.

    My best advice: Listen more closely to how English speakers do it. It's easy once you get the (!) hang of it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,815
    #3

    Re: Specific cases of "TH" sound

    Many BrE speakers will use a glottal instead of the /t/.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,555
    #4

    Re: Specific cases of "TH" sound

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Many BrE speakers will use a glottal instead of the /t/.
    Thanks, Tdol. You're right, as usual. I Googled "glottal t" and found this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edxwQK1zBxw

    That's what I was trying to say. Now you've given me a word to say it with!

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: Specific cases of "TH" sound

    Note that although you say 'the TH sound' the example includes two sounds that are represented by the letters 'th': // in 'this', and /θ/ in 'thing'. In those two phonemes, the tongue's in the same position, but // is voiced (and if you don't know what voicing is, that explains why you say things like 'the TH sound' )

    b

Similar Threads

  1. "Sound file A and B" or "Sound files A and B"?
    By thincat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Jan-2013, 10:22
  2. "are" or "is" for countable nouns in specific phrases
    By Pierce111 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2012, 18:30
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-May-2012, 22:51
  4. What is the common thing in "would" in many cases?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 10-Jan-2011, 21:46
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Feb-2007, 03:54

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •