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      • Native Language:
      • French
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      • France
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Aug 2014
    • Posts: 75
    #1

    condensing sentences

    I would like to talk about the first example below.

    (ex) I write faster in pencil than in pen.

    In the long form, I can say, "I write faster in pencil than I write in pen."

    I hope that everyone agrees with me. Next, I would like to use this logic backwards to condense sentences.

    (1a) I like to run more than I like to walk.

    (1b) I like to run more than to walk.

    (2a) I like to play hockey more than I like to write novels.

    (2b) I like to play hockey more than to write novels.

    (3a) I want to become a teacher more than I want to become an accountant.

    (3b) I want to become a teacher more than to become an accountant.

    (3c) I want to become a teacher more than an accountant.

    (4a) I am able to type faster than I am able to write.

    (4b) I am able to type faster than to write.

    (5a) I work with a calculator more than I do with a computer.

    (5b) I work with a calculator more than I do.

    If my logic is correct, all of the sentences above are correct. So, (3) is condensed a lot when you compare (3a) with (3c). However, my logic is not

    completely correct. I have put (1b), (2b), (3b) and (4b) in bold above because some of my classmates think that it is incorrect to use an infinitive

    after "than". They say that they have never heard any native English speakers say these "b" sentences. (5a) is the trickiest one to condense.

    How can you condense the "a" sentences above? I really do not know how to fix my mistakes when my logic does not always work.

    I have been thinking about these sentences all day. Please give me some help. I am very confused now. Thank you very much.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
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    #2

    Re: condensing sentences

    When you condense sentences sometimes they will still be understandable, and sometimes they will not. Of your examples, there are two (at least) that you definitely don't want to use. Those are:

    I want to become a teacher more than an accountant.
    I work with a calculator more than I do.



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