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  1. a_vee's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "Having gotten all As, the students are..." What's the function of the gerund?

    Having gotten all As, the students are studying less.

    I know that "having gotten" is a gerund in the perfect form, but what is the function in the sentence? Is it a subject complement?

    Thanks for the help.
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  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Having gotten all As, the students are..." What's the function of the gerund?

    It might be slightly idiomatic. The sentence could be phrased:

    - Because they got all A's, the students are studying less.
    - Now that they have all A's, the students are studying less.

    Some other examples that might help give you the idea:

    - Having just painted the house, they were eager to take pictures of it.
    - Having grown up in France, he didn't need to read the French subtitles.
    - Having already slept for ten hours, she didn't want a nap.
    - Having marched all day, they were ready to rest.

    Hope that helps!

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Having gotten all As, the students are..." What's the function of the gerund?

    In this sentence, "having gotten all A's" is a participial phrase. It acts as an adjective that modifies "students". "Having" is not a gerund there, it is a participle. The only way to tell one -ing from another is by its use. A gerund always acts as a noun. A participle can be part of a verb or it can be a modifier (adjective or adverb) and can introduce a modifying phrase.

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