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    #1

    Is "as" a relative pronoun?

    Hello everybody.

    My friend said that "as" was a relative pronoun. But when i looked in Longman Dictionary, it is defined as adverb, preposion, conjunction, NOT pronoun. Let see the setence below:

    David such a good boy as all the teacher like.

    Can i replace "as" with "who"?

    Thanks for reading!

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    #2

    Re: Is "as" a relative pronoun?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER ****

    Hello, Commadela:

    I cannot answer your question, but I can tell you that, yes, sometimes as is, indeed, a relative pronoun.

    Here are some examples from one of my favorite books:

    1. Such papers as these (are) must be destroyed.
    2. Such of the neighbors as were invited came early.

    a. The book tells us to compare it with: Those of the neighbors who were invited came early.

    3. Such funds as are needed will be provided.
    4. Such a record as this (is) should not be forgotten.




    James


    If you ever want an excellent description of all the uses of that "troublemaker" as, try to get a copy of a book entitled English Review Grammar by Walter Kay Smart. You might be able to find a copy in a good library. It is an older book, so I do not know whether it is still in print.


    P.S. Another of my favorite books explains that "as" is really a conjunction that is being used "to do the work of [a relative]."
    Last edited by TheParser; 29-Aug-2014 at 12:12. Reason: spacing mistake; added P.S.

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    #3

    Re: Is "as" a relative pronoun?

    Some dictionaries list "as" as a pronoun in some uses. Not all dictionaries do that.

    See here.

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    #4

    Re: Is "as" a relative pronoun?

    It's used as a relative pronoun in my local Lancashire dialect.

    'It's 'im as comes for me pools money.'

    'Share yer toys wi' childer as 'ave nowt.'

    I don't recommend its use by students or learners.

    `
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 29-Aug-2014 at 18:28.

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    #5

    Re: Is "as" a relative pronoun?

    Quote Originally Posted by Commadela View Post

    Can i replace "as" with "who"?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Commadela:

    I have done some more research, and I am now 99.99% confident in saying that the answer is: NO.


    1. A world-famous scholar cites this sentence: "He was such a listener as most musicians would be glad to welcome."

    a. That sentence seems to me to be similar to yours: "David was such a good student as all teachers would be glad to teach."

    2. Please look at these sentences from another book:

    a. "This seminar is designed for such physicans who plan to study [name of subject]."
    b. The club's Grounds Committee objects to such playing conditions which exist in the farthest greens."
    c. Horace will render such assistance that the circumstances allow."

    The book says that "who," "which," and "that" should be replaced by as in those sentences.



    James


    First source: Otto Jespersen, Essentials of English Grammar (1933).
    Second source: Morton S. Freeman, A Treasury for Word Lovers (1983).




    *****

    This is only my OPINION: If I understand my books correctly, the construction (type of sentence) such ... as is either formal or archaic [old-fashioned]. In other words, it is not the kind of construction that most people would use in ordinary conversation nowadays. For example, if I wanted to express the idea in your sentence, I would probably say something like:

    David is the kind of student all teachers would like to have.
    David is the kind of student whom all teachers would like to have.
    David is the kind of student who all teachers would like to have. ["Who" is a violation of traditional rules.]
    David is the kind of student that all teachers would like to have. [Some people actually prefer "that," for the sentence refers to a "kind."]

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