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    #1

    A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    Hi everybody. I am new here. Perhaps someone can help translating a well-known russian idiomatic expression into english...

    Translated literally, it goes like this: "running around like an idiot with a painted bucket" ( or, "a painted bag", rather).

    It means - someone is really excited about something insignificant and silly like a "painted bucket", making a big deal out of an object, overvaluing something and making a fool of yourself in doing so.

    What do you think is the closest? Someone suggested the chicken with its head cut off, but that is not even close.. The point of the saying is not to scold for erratic or frenzied behaviour, but to point out undue excitement about an unworthy object ( or a person, or a pursuit)...

    THANK YOU!
    LF

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    #2

    Re: A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    I actually think that it's not a bad suggestion if you want to translate it with an idiom. If you supply what it is that is causing them to do this, then it could work. You can use headless chicken for being extremely busy or very excited- it doesn't have to be critical or scolding. You could use like a kid with a new toy, but that would also work for other contexts, so it isn't exact either.
    Last edited by Tdol; 01-Sep-2014 at 15:55.

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    #3

    Re: A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    In America we say "like a kid in a candy store." But the emphasis in that expression is on the kid's unrestrained delight and inability to choose rather than on the manic behaviour. And also, the kid is not wrong.

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    #4

    Re: A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    I don't think that we have a precise equivalent to that expression in English, but "He's living in a fool's paradise" comes pretty close.

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    #5

    Re: A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    The original idiom makes me think of 'making a fuss [of it]' or 'being obsessed [with it]' (in both cases 'it' meaning something not worth so much attention) but neither is an idiom. 'A bee in one's bonnet' maybe?

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    #6

    Red face Re: A british or american idiomatic equivalent needed...

    Hello,

    Maybe this British idiom is more appropriate "make a song and dance about something". As far as I know it means to make a big deal out of something which is not that important.

    Cheers!

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