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    #1

    God will rot him

    Hi teachers,


    Is "God will rot him in hell" correct?


    Thanks.
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  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: God will rot him

    No, "rot" is not transitive. That is, one thing does not rot another.

    "God will see that he rots in hell," perhaps.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. NortT's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: God will rot him

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No, "rot" is not transitive. That is, one thing does not rot another.

    "God will see that he rots in hell," perhaps.
    Why does Macmillan dictionary claim (http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...ry/british/rot) that "rot" intransitive as well as transitive?
    Explain, please. I'm confused.
    Naeem Afzal, I think that a verb "to burn" is better here.

    I'm not a teacher.
    Please, show me every single one of my mistakes. Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: God will rot him

    I am wondering if caries can rot a tooth (as in "caries sets in at a weak point and spreads to rot the whole tooth")?

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: God will rot him

    Quote Originally Posted by NortT View Post
    Naeem Afzal, I think that a verb "to burn" is better here.
    NortT, I think that the verb 'to immolate' may also be better here.

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    #6

    Re: God will rot him

    I think that the more neutral verb "punish" would be enough.
    As for "to immolate", I have some doubts about the appropriacy of it being used in this context, although that's just my opinion.
    "To immolate" means "to kill as a sacrifice, especially by burning" (taken from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...glish/immolate)

    Not a teacher.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: God will rot him

    'To immolate' means 'to kill someone by burning them'── quoted from http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...itish/immolate

    Not a teacher.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: God will rot him

    I was overly broad.
    Water can rot wood.
    Sugar can rot teeth.
    Those are transitive uses.

    However, someone left in Hell for all eternity rots in the intransitive sense.

    Over time, the water caused the wood to rot. It acted on it.
    Over time, the water rotted the wood. (Transitive)
    Over time, the wood rotted. (Intransitive)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: God will rot him

    There are many synonyms for "kill". But I think that not only "how" but allso "what for" adds up to what it really means. But never mind. Let us wait and see what natives think of it.

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    #10

    Re: God will rot him

    Thank you for the answers.

    Is "God will burn/immolate him in hell" correct?
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