Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 1,507
    #1

    to take over from the failure of a tire?

    It's me again.

    Instead of going on the metal rail, wider tires rest on a new track on the outside of the classic rails that are nevertheless retained to allow classic rolling stock to go, and in case of a flat tire to take over from the failure of a tire, since the rubber-tired cars keep their classic metal rail wheels.

    By a classic rolling stock, I mean a set of both rubber and classic rail steel wheels that goes underneath a subway car.

    In my opinion, "to take over from the failure of a tire" alone does not make sense. Shouldn't it be written as "to take over from (from the tires) in the event of a tire?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 254
    #2

    Re: to take over from the failure of a tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Shouldn't it be written as "to take over from (from the tires) in the event of a tire?"
    NOT A TEACHER
    What do you mean by the phrase in bold (above)? I don't understand.
    Please notify me of any mistakes in my posts. It is much appreciated.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #3

    Re: to take over from the failure of a tire?

    I think he means "tire failure".
    Are we talking about a train? Train carriages are sometimes called cars, but I think it should be mentioned at least once what sort of vehicle we are talking about (though you do say "subway car"). "Classic rolling stock" seems to mean motorcycles on the following page:
    http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowUs..._of_Goias.html
    Can "classic rolling stock" mean trains with conventional wheels and also trains with both types of wheels as you claim?
    I think "take over from the failure of a tire" is easily understandable in the context, if not exactly accurate. It's a confusing sentence.

Similar Threads

  1. Bike tire
    By TitoBr in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2013, 20:31
  2. [Grammar] Size Of Tire
    By Restrict in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2012, 07:36
  3. tire VS. tired
    By Suthipong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-Jan-2011, 09:57
  4. [General] flat-tire
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2010, 11:12
  5. [General] i got a flat tire
    By rogergm62 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2008, 19:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •