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    #1

    Complex Sentences & Clauses

    I understand that a clause must always contain a subject and a predicate (typically a verb).

    I also understand that a complex sentence is one in which a dependent clause links with an independent clause.

    I originally thought that the following sentence qualified as a complex sentence, but given that the middle section lacks a verb, I am now at a bit of a loss as to how to describe it.

    Mark Roberts, last year’s British winner, crashed out during the third lap.

    Is the text in bold a clause? If so, what sort? If not, what is it? (A phrase?)

    If it is merely a phrase, what sort of sentence is this? (A simple one masquerading as something more complicated?)

    Thanks in advance for any clarification.

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    #2

    Re: Complex Sentences & Clauses

    Hi, Matt—Last year's British winner is a noun phrase that is functioning as an appositive, just as the noun phrase my best friend is functioning in the following variation: Mark Roberts, my best friend, crashed out during the third lap. The appositive, though not a clause, could be converted into a clause (a relative clause) with the addition of who was: Mark Roberts, who [subject] was [verb] last year's British winner, crashed out during the third lap.

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    #3

    Re: Complex Sentences & Clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    Hi, Matt—Last year's British winner is a noun phrase that is functioning as an appositive, just as the noun phrase my best friend is functioning in the following variation: Mark Roberts, my best friend, crashed out during the third lap. The appositive, though not a clause, could be converted into a clause (a relative clause) with the addition of who was: Mark Roberts, who [subject] was [verb] last year's British winner, crashed out during the third lap.

    That's brilliant. Thanks very much for replying and apologies for not stating 'not a teacher' on the other boards.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Complex Sentences & Clauses

    I don't know what you meant by "typically a verb" in your first sentence. Clauses must have a verb.

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