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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Arrow glare or sunk in dark spot

    Hello,
    According to the attachment, what does 'sunk' mean?
    I couldn't find the noun :sunk in the dictionary, there is only 'sink' verb.
    http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/sunk
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. lotus888's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: glare or sunk in dark spot

    It means to be submerged in a lower spot. Image pixels have a numerical value. High value would be bright. Low value would be dark.

    It's a common problem with digital cameras that a bright area might wash out the image, or a dark area become darker because of too much contrast. Our eyes are much better than a camera in "balancing" an image so that we see what we want to see without glare or contrasting darkness.



    --lotus

  3. nininaz's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: glare or sunk in dark spot

    --lotus[/QUOTE]
    Thanks so much for your informative response.
    But why I couldn't find the "sunk" as noun in every dictionaries like Longman,Cambridge,..
    Could you please tell me the references of the meaning "sunk" in any dictionaries?!
    Thanks in advanced.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Sep-2014 at 08:08. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

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    #4

    Re: glare or sunk in dark spot

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Thanks so much for your informative response.

    But why I couldn't find the "sunk" as noun in every dictionaries like Longman,Cambridge,..
    Could you please tell me the references of the meaning "sunk" in any dictionaries?!

    Thanks in advanced. There's no need to thank us in advance (not 'advanced'). Just click Thank when you get a useful reply.
    The word 'sunk' is not a noun. It's the past participle of 'sink'.

    'Details may be lost in glare or (may be) sunk in a dark spot.'

  4. nininaz's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: glare or sunk in dark spot

    So the sink have the following meaning?!
    become weaker

    5 [intransitive] to decrease in amount, volume, strength, etc: The pound has sunk to its lowest recorded level against the dollar.
    or

    2 [+
    object]:to move down to a lower position:The sun sank behind the hills.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Sep-2014 at 08:26. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

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    #6

    Re: glare or sunk in dark spot

    There's no need to quote a post when your reply immediately follows it.

    So does the word 'sink' have the following meaning?

    become weaker
    It means 'becomes less visible' — maybe even 'invisible'.

    In meaning 5 above, the 'etc' can include 'visibility'.

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