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    #1

    Does a subordinate clause turns into part of the subject in the complex sentence?

    Dear members and teachers:


    I would like to know if the subordinate clause becomes part of the subject in the complex sentence when joined with the main one.

    1) The man is my brother.

    2) The man is standing in the corner.

    Since the two clauses above have a person as a subject, the relative pronoun who, which is used as subject when related to person, must be used in order to join both clause to turn them into one clause as below.

    3) The man who is standing in the corner is my brother.

    By analysing the complex sentence I have the following:

    a) The subordinate clause who is standing in the corner, which was added to the subject noun of the main clause, is now the adjective of this subject noun.

    b) The relative pronoun who ─which is use as subject─ is substituting the subject noun of the the subordinate or dependent clause, and introducing/relating the subordinate clause in the complex sentence with the main one.

    c) My brother is the complement of the first clause, as well as the complement of the complex sentence.


    QUESTION


    Is the subject noun of the main clause the man plus the subordinate clause who is standing in the corner the subject of the complex sentence, being now the subject (the man who is standing in the corner)?


    I will deeply appreciate your help and assistance in this issue.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 16-Mar-2015 at 00:47.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Does a subordinate clause turns into part of the subject in the complex sentence?

    That is a complex question. The simple subject of the sentence is "man". The complete subject of the sentence is the simple subject with all of its modifiers. That includes the article before "man" and the relative clause that modifies "man".

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    #3

    Re: Does a subordinate clause turns into part of the subject in the complex sentence?

    Thank you MikeNewYork.


    This clears out my doub.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Does a subordinate clause turns into part of the subject in the complex sentence?

    You're welcome, but it is not necessary to create a new post to say thank you. Just click on the "thank" button on the lower left side of the post.

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