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    #1

    on leave

    In English, do you say “on leave” when it’s just a day off from work?
    For example, is this “out of office auto-reply “ possible in such a case?

    Thank you for your message.
    I am out of the office on leave on Thursday, September 25th
    .

    How about when you take a few days off?

    The purpose of taking the day(s) off is just to use up the paid holidays.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on leave

    I would just say "out of the office". You don't have to call the days off anything.

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    #3

    Re: on leave

    Thank you.

    How about other contexts in which "on leave" is used?
    Is it possible that one day or a few days can be "leave"?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: on leave

    I don't use "leave" much in business except for a "leave of absence" which is usually a long period. such maternity leave. I prefer "vacation" for short periods.

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    #5

    Re: on leave

    Not a teacher

    But using "on leave" is common in Australia. I found following examples just by searching my e-mails.
    I will be on leave from ... to ....
    I am on leave until Tuesday 15th July.
    I'm currently on leave.
    Thursday is my last day at work prior to going on leave for most of the next two weeks.
    I am on leave at the moment but ....

    I've got e-mails using medical leave, annual leave and personal leave as well.

  3. lotus888's Avatar
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    English Teacher
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    #6

    Re: on leave

    People don't generally tell you "why" they're on leave in auto-reply emails, especially if it's for a medical reason. Most of the time, they don't even tell you if it's for a vacation. Why make everyone else jealous?

    They do say "I will be away from the office from...", or "I will be on leave from...", or "I will be away from my desk from..."


    --lotus
    Last edited by lotus888; 26-Sep-2014 at 04:11.

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