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    #1

    Subjunctive mode

    In the subjunctive, does the pronoun following the linking verb take the subjective or objective case? Is it "if I were SHE" or "if I were HER"?

  1. lotus888's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    Welcome, C.Miles!

    That's subjunctive mood.

    "If I were her..."

    Treat the pronoun as an object.


    --lotus
    Last edited by lotus888; 25-Sep-2014 at 05:29.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    I disagree with Lotus. Grammatically, the pronoun following a linking verb should be the nominative "she". You will hear the other form, however.

  3. lotus888's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    Here is an interesting discussion on the topic. Sometimes in English, there is no pat answer...

    https://www.englishforums.com/Englis...jjznx/post.htm



    --lotus

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    #5

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    Yes, but that is a bunch of opinions. There is a grammatical answer to this question which I believe learners need to know. They take examinations. What they do with the information is up to them.

  5. lotus888's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    For those who are interested, this is an excellent discussion/synopsis on the subjunctive, with excellent examples and references.

    http://random-idea-english.blogspot....bjunctive.html

    http://random-idea-english.blogspot....ted-again.html


    --lotus

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    #7

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    I honestly think that they're both correct. I'm not one of It is I crew, but I don't think it is right to say that only her can be used. She would be the traditional form, while her is widely used today. There are arguments for both, though I favour one.

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    #8

    Re: Subjunctive mode

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, C. Miles:

    1. If you are taking a test or writing an official report, I agree that you should follow the rule: use SHE.

    2. But if you are a young person and, especially, a male, I suggest that you speak as do most Americans (young and old) in ordinary conversation: use HER.

    3. In fact, probably most Americans would not even use the subjunctive: "If I was her, I certainly would not lend James $100."

    4. There are rules and then there is real life situations in which we have to get along with other human beings.

    a. I am sure that you have seen (American-style) football players on television.

    i. I have NO DOUBT that if a tough, masculine American football player were to say, "If I were she, I certainly would not lend James $100," he would not be on that team for long!




    James
    Last edited by TheParser; 26-Sep-2014 at 13:09. Reason: changed my example sentence

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