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    #1

    is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    It is me one more time.

    Suppose we have a big ship with an engine room ant other important things. We enter the engine room and to our horror, we find that a large piece of insulation is missing from the exhaust pipe (not "a large piece of insulation is missing on the exhaust pipe"). What is worse, the steering wheel is missing from the wheelhouse (I don't think "the steering wheel is missing in the wheelhouse" should be used).

    What do you think of my conclusions? I may be wrong.

    Thank you.

    Whatever preposition we could try to use after "missing", the best option would be "from".

    Do you agree?
    Last edited by JACEK1; 25-Sep-2014 at 21:09.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    It is me one more time.

    Suppose we have a big ship with an engine room and other important things.
    That is what is called unintentional humor.

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    We enter the engine room and to our horror, we find that a large piece of insulation is missing from the exhaust pipe (not "a large piece of insulation is missing on the exhaust pipe"). What is worse, the steering wheel is missing from the wheelhouse (I don't think "the steering wheeel is missing in the wheelhouse" should be used).

    What do you think of my conclusions? I may be wrong.

    Thank you.

    Whatever preposition we could try to use after "missing", the best option would be "from".

    Do you agree?
    What I think is that somebody is stealing your ship piece by piece.

    I think your question is did you form your sentences correctly, and, yes, you did. Don't change anything! (Yes, "missing...from" is a very very common way of saying that. That's especially true if you want to say that something is missing from (there's that word) a specific area.)

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    #3

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    The ship is falling apart. My focus is on when to use "missing from" and "missing + another preposition"?

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    There is another possibility. If you are talking about a time period, you might use for. ​For example: "She has been missing for days."



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    #5

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    There are other possibilites:

    'She went missing after the party.'

    'The U-bend is missing below the sink.'

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    #6

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    If I didn't know what was wrong with the sink, would it be possible for me to say 'The U-bend is missing from the sink?' By using "from", I would indicate the fact that the U-bend is missing regardless of the failure location.

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    #7

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    Certainly it would be possible ... and correct and common.

    As Tarheel said '"missing...from" is a very very common way of saying that'.

    You asked
    'Is "missing" always followed by "from"?'

    We have demonstrated that the answer is 'no'.

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    #8

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    You are 100 % right. I, as a non-native speaker of English would stick to "missing from" for fear of making a mistake.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: is "missing" always followed by "from" or by other prepositions?

    One more thing from me. It is quite possible to use "missing" without any prepositions. (See made-up conversation below.)

    Bill: The thingamajig is missing. Does Sam have it?
    Bob: Yeah, Sam's got it. He'll bring it back when he's finished with it.
    Bill: Is he going to have it long?
    Bob: No, I don't think he'll have it very long.
    Bill: OK.

    (BTW, there are three English words that are known worldwide: hello, OK, and I forgot the other one. (Two out of three is not bad.))


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