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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    priori knowledge vs experienced knowledge

    I feel the answers are all messed up, and it's hard to differentiate the two. Don't b, c fall into "priori knowledge"? I think the answers are wrong and confusing.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Q. Please chooose corresponding answers in the table.
    <examples>
    ⓐ Observing a tree
    ⓑ Conducting experiments
    ⓒ Knowing the meaning of words
    ⓓ Seeing a tree outside
    ⓔ investigating bachelors
    how to get a priori knowledge
    how to get experienced knowledge
    a, b, d
    c,e

    76)In general, much of our knowledge of the world comes from experiencing it. We know there is a tree outside a window, for instance, because we see it. We know the tree requires sunlight and water to thrive because scientists have carefully observed these facts and conducted experiments on them. However, some of our knowledge does not depend upon experience. For instance, we know that all bachelors are unmarried men. What is our justification for believing this? It does not depend upon any experience. If it did, then each of us would have to go out and investigate bachelors and determine that they are unmarried men in order to know so. But we don't. Just by knowing the meaning of the words bachelor and unmarried men, we know that all bachelors are unmarried men. This knowledge that does not depend upon experience is called a priori knowledge.
    Last edited by keannu; 28-Sep-2014 at 23:48.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: priori knowledge vs experienced knowledge

    This seems to be so hard, getting no answer. Only if I can get just one-word answer.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: priori knowledge vs experienced knowledge

    It's a total mess. Also, it's "a priori" not "priori".

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: priori knowledge vs experienced knowledge

    I conclude that this is the only a priori knowledge among the examples. If you have a different opinion, please let me know.
    ⓒ Knowing the meaning of words

  5. lotus888's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: priori knowledge vs experienced knowledge

    A priori and a posteriori knowledge are terms widely used in epistemology (the study of knowledge), a branch of study in the field of philosophy.

    http://dictionary.infoplease.com/a-priori
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_priori_and_a_posteriori

    For a priori knowledge, the answer is C.

    A and D are the same -- observing a tree. B is conducting an experiment. C is investigating a bachelor.

    A, D, B and C involve observation, experimentation or investigation. These are all in the domain of a posteriori knowledge -- knowledge obtained from observation or experimentation.

    C is knowing the meaning of words. This is in the domain of a priori knowledge. The key is knowing. The definitions of the words are already in your mind. Even if you didn't know the meaning of the word, you can use your a priori knowledge of similar words or experiences to infer its meaning.

    Take the simple example of gargantuan. It means big, but in a larger sense. And it usually applies to living things. You already know what big means. And you get the concept of something being bigger. Of course you know what a living thing is. Now, you know (in general) what gargantuan means without walking out the door to investigate its meaning. You can even try using it in a sentence.

    The new Godzilla was gargantuan.


    --lotus
    Last edited by lotus888; 29-Sep-2014 at 20:48.

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