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    #1

    The moral virtues are with Aristotle.

    http://www.memoriapress.com/articles...w-better-greek
    The distinction, as Arnold so lucidly states it, arises from the difference between doing and knowing. The Hebrew is concerned with practice, the Greek with knowledge. Right conduct is the ultimate concern of the Hebrew, right thinking that of the Greek. Duty and strictness of conscience are the paramount things in life for the Hebrew; for the Greek the spontaneous and luminous play of the intelligence. The Hebrew thus extols the moral virtues as the substance and meaning of life; the Greek subordinates them to the intellectual virtues, and Arnold rightly observes: "The moral virtues are with Aristotle but the porch and access to the intellectual and with these last is blessedness."

    What does the last sentence mean? Can anyone paraphrase it in simpler English?
    Last edited by sitifan; 30-Sep-2014 at 14:35.
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A difficult sentence!

    It makes no sense at all to me.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A difficult sentence!

    "The moral virtues are with Aristotle but the porch and access to the intellectual and with these last is blessedness."
    The paragraph talks about the Hebrews, for whom blessedness comes from moral virtue, and compares them to the Greeks, such as Aristotle, for whom the virtues were merely the portals to the intellect, and the intellect the key to blessedness. I would have put is as, "The moral virtues, for Aristotle, are but (only) the porch and access (ie. the doorway/portal) to the intellectual." The philosopher must be virtuous, but this virtue is a means to a higher end - the intellect, and the understanding which comes from the intellectual knowedge is blessedness.

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    #4

    Re: A difficult sentence!

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "The moral virtues are with Aristotle but the porch and access to the intellectual and with these last is blessedness."
    What does "these last" mean?
    I need native speakers' help.

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