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    #1

    git/get

    • Greedy, scrounging get, that fella.
    • Cheeky get.



    The term “get” stems from “git”, I take it, in British English. Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Will I be right that it is more popular in the north part of the UK? How about the USA, is it in use over there as well, and if so, in what variant (get or git)?

    Many thanks

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    #2

    Re: git/get

    Referring to someone as a "git" is British.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Git_(slang)

    A shortening of beget,[5] get insinuates that the recipient is someone's misbegotten offspring and therefore a bastard.

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    #3

    Re: git/get

    I am unsure whether "get" stems from "git", or the other way round. Anyway, they mean exactly the same thing - although I believe that "get" may be viewed as slightly less insulting than "git".
    I always associate the term "get" with Liverpool slang, whereas "git" is used throughout the UK. I cannot answer for the US.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #4

    Re: git/get

    Marvellous! Description showing how severe it is; and yet its origins. It is interesting to know that the term “git”is originally an alteration of the word “get”, and not the other way round. It’s not that I have a foul tongue, but it’s been on my mind for a while. The titles of the references are attention-grabbing recourses, pity they are not available to read online. I am very curious.

    So, “git” is British by the sound of it.

    I will put the “get” among Northern words then; with annotation regarding Scousers, of course.

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