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    #1

    Comma connecting ideas.

    I have been putting in commas and taking them out the whole morning writing this. I wonder if someone could go through the text. I understand it needs someone having the patience of a saint to check this somewhat long text but I would like to be done with the rules and then save it as a reference for the future once it’s been corrected.
    All comments will be greatly appreciated.


    It’s a common knowledge that comma points out where to stop for a brief pause/when to take a breath. Piece of cake? I am not so sure. Easier said than done; I would say but here we go:

    Separates three or more items in a sentence:

    I will have sandwich, crisps, pop, cookie, apple pie and cream.

    In AmE, however, the above sentence would most likely have so called the Oxford Comma inserted before the final conjunction.

    The Oxford Comma can appear also in the BrE, if there is a risk of merging the last two items. In that case for the sake of clarity, comma can be put before the final word end. Apple pie, and cream are not considered here as a single item:

    I will have sandwich, crisps, pop, cookie, apple pie, and cream.

    When we want to use certain adjectives (so called coordinate adjectives), which can be exchanged with each other without any change of the meaning of a sentence. How will we know for sure if they are coordinate? By inversion of the nouns in a sentence. If the meaning remains the same - they are. We can also insert an and between them and check the meaning:

    Nice, well-maintained garden.

    Well-maintained, nice garden.

    To separate two independent clauses with conjunctions such as and, or, so, yet, for, nor, but, or when the sentence starts with a dependant clause:

    I saw herbeautiful garden, and I could not believe she designed it herself.

    When I finally arrived at my destination, it was a relief.

    In case of emergency, use blankets.

    Comma before end can connect two nouns in a compound subject, therefore does not need to be placed before the mentioned end (the same applies to putting a comma between two verbs):

    My mother and her friend want to visit Michael and his wife.

    We put a comma before the conjunction because; only to avoid confusion.

    After words used to introduce a phrase, like yes/no, furthermore, well, meanwhile, hello, unfortunately, now, and after longer introductory parts of asentence:

    Given my input to the discussion, the problem should be sorted out.

    Yes, you are right.

    He said,“I will always remember that”.

    When we want to incorporate quotations (quotation must start with a capital letter). We omit commas, if quotations are preceded by the word that. If a quote is very long, and serves to explain something, colon should be used, and not the comma.

    They expressed their opinion that “it was inevitable”.

    To set off names and expressions, around Interrupters, such as by the way, however, indeed, needless to say (names also belong to that group):
    Would you be kind enough, Michael, to do it for me? You do not have to, however, thatwould be nice.

    To separate the day of the month from the year (no comma needed if there is no day). We also need the comma after the year; when we are more precise and provide the reader with the exact time:

    Septemberthe 1st, 1927.

    Septemberthe 1st, 1927, at 7am.

    When we directly address a person having a tittle:

    Yes, Doctor, I will follow your advice.

    To enclose titles or degrees with names:

    J.Harward, MP. , has just arrived.

    To separate a question from a statement:

    I can go now, can’t I?

    We use comma after abbreviations, such as e.g., i.e., etc., and before namely.

    We insert a comma to add some extra information (aside elements), which do not form essential part of the whole sentence.

    Everyone, that is a common knowledge, loves his films.

    To express contrasts:

    At the crack of dawn most people wake up, not go to bed.

    It was all about their personalities, not their neighbours.

    To avoid/remove ambiguity:

    Toast, and bacon, and eggs.

    Fancy salad, garlic, bread, and turkey?

    In long numbers:

    1,253,728.

    Between repeated word. That will make it clear; that you did it on purpose:

    We really, really love outings.

    Before but we put comma only if it starts an independent clause.

    They want to venture into new markets, but the boss is not available at the moment to give them the thumbs up.



    Last edited by Auldlangsyne; 07-Oct-2014 at 14:19. Reason: deleted one of the examples considered vulgar.
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    I had finished the whole thing, and then it got lost when I had to log in again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    I have been putting in commas and taking them out the whole morning writing this. I wonder if someone could go through the text. I understand it needs someone having the patience of a saint to check this somewhat long text, but I would like to be done with the rules and then save it as a reference for the future once its been corrected.
    All comments will be greatly appreciated.


    Its a common knowledge that comma points out where to stop for a brief pause/when to take a breath. Piece of cake? I am not so sure. Easier said than done
    , I would say, but here we go:

    The expression is "It's common knowledge", not "it's a common knowledge".




  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    I have been putting in commas and taking them out the whole morning writing this. I wonder if someone could go through the text. I understand it needs someone having the patience of a saint to check this somewhat long text but I would like to be done with the rules and then save it as a reference for the future once its been corrected.
    All comments will be greatly appreciated.


    Its a common knowledge that comma points out where to stop for a brief pause/when to take a breath. Piece of cake? I am not so sure. Easier said than done; I would say but here we go:

    Separates three or more items in a sentence:

    I will have a sandwich, crisps, pop, cookie, apple pie and cream.

    In AmE, however, the above sentence would most likely have a so-called the Oxford Comma inserted before the final conjunction.

    The Oxford Comma can appear also in the BrE, if there is a risk of merging the last two items. In that case, for the sake of clarity, the comma can be put before the final word end. Apple pie, and cream are not considered here as a single item:


    Got to go!

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    #4

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post

    Easier said than done; I would say but here we go:






    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,

    I would feel more comfortable with:

    Easier said than done, I would say, but here we go:


    "I would say" seems to be one of those "asides" that you mention.


    James

    P.S. I would also use another example sentence in place of "He smells, f-rts, and burps." Even in 2014, the F-word is very vulgar.
    Last edited by TheParser; 07-Oct-2014 at 11:29. Reason: deleted a verb

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    #5

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I had finished the whole thing, and then it got lost when I had to log in again.
    I am so sorry. Thank you very much for your time. I will scrutinize what's left.

    Thanks for all the corrections and remarks.
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

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    #6

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    You are right. It is kind of long.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post



    In AmE, however, the above sentence would most likely have so called the Oxford Comma inserted before the final conjunction.

    The Oxford Comma can appear also in the
    BrE if there is a risk of merging the last two items. In that case, for the sake of clarity, a comma can be put before the final word end. Apple pie, and cream are not considered here as a single item:

    I will have a sandwich, crisps, pop, cookie, apple pie, and cream.


    Start it thusly:

    Use a comma to


  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    I am going to charge more for doing this. (It is certainly true that opinions vary as to what is considered vulgar. What one person regards as funny another might consider obscene.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post




    The Oxford Comma
    can appear also in BrE, if there is a risk of merging the last two items. In that case, for the sake of clarity, a comma can be put before the final word end. Apple pie, and cream are not considered here as a single item:

    I will have a sandwich, crisps, pop, cookie, apple pie, and cream.

    We use a comma when we want to use certain adjectives (so called coordinate adjectives) which can be exchanged with each other without any change of the meaning of a sentence. How will we know for sure if they are coordinate? By inversion of the nouns in a sentence. If the meaning remains the same - they are. (The farther away related items get from each other the more chance there is for confusion. I would spell out what you mean there rather than assume that the reader will understand.) We can also insert an and between them and check the meaning:

    Nice, well-maintained garden.

    Well-maintained, nice garden.
    (Will all your readers understand that the first one is good English, but the second one is not?) (Say: "a nice, well-maintained garden")

    To separate two independent clauses with conjunctions such as and, or, so, yet, for, nor, but, or when the sentence starts with a dependant clause:

    I saw herbeautiful garden, and I could not believe she designed it herself.

    When I finally arrived at my destination, it was a relief.

    In case of emergency, use blankets.


  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post





    To separate two independent clauses with conjunctions such as and, or, so, yet, for, nor, but, or when the sentence starts with a dependant clause:



    My mother and her friend want to visit Michael and his wife. (That's an interesting sentence here.)

    We put a comma before the conjunction because only to avoid confusion.

    After words used to introduce a phrase, like yes/no, furthermore, well, meanwhile, hello, unfortunately, now, and after longer introductory parts of asentence:

    Given my input to the discussion, the problem should be sorted out.

    Yes, you are right.

    He said,I will always remember that.

    When we want to incorporate quotations (quotation must start with a capital letter). We omit commas, if quotations are preceded by the word that. If a quote is very long, and serves to explain something, a colon should be used, and not a comma.

    They expressed their opinion that it was inevitable.

    To set off names and expressions, around interrupters such as by the way, however, indeed, needless to say (names also belong to that group):
    Would you be kind enough, Michael, to do it for me? You do not have to, however, that would be nice.

    To separate the day of the month from the year (no comma needed if there is no day). We also need the comma after the year when we are more precise and provide the reader with the exact time:

    September the 1st, 1927.

    September the 1st, 1927, at 7am.

    When we directly address a person having a title:

    Yes, Doctor, I will follow your advice.

    To enclose titles or degrees with names:

    J.Harward, MP. , has just arrived.

    To separate a question from a statement:

    I can go now, cant I?

    We use a comma after abbreviations, such as e.g., i.e., etc., and before namely.

    We insert a comma to add some extra information (aside elements), which does not form an essential part of the whole sentence.

    Everyone, that is a common knowledge, loves his films.

    We don't say a common knowledge. Instead, we might say: "It is common knowledge that everyone loves his films. (I suggest that you use a different sample sentence.)

  6. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post



    When we want to incorporate quotations (quotation must start with a capital letter). We omit commas, if quotations are preceded by the word that. If a quote is very long, and serves to explain something, a colon should be used, and not a comma.

    They expressed their opinion that it was inevitable.

    To set off names and expressions, around interrupters, such as by the way, however, indeed, needless to say (names also belong to that group):
    Would you be kind enough, Michael, to do it for me? You do not have to, however, thatwould be nice.

    To separate the day of the month from the year (no comma needed if there is no day). We also need the comma after the year; when we are more precise and provide the reader with the exact time:

    Septemberthe 1st, 1927.

    Septemberthe 1st, 1927, at 7am.

    When we directly address a person having a title:

    Yes, Doctor, I will follow your advice.

    To enclose titles or degrees with names:

    J.Harward, MP. , has just arrived.

    To separate a question from a statement:

    I can go now, cant I?

    We use a comma after abbreviations, such as e.g., i.e., etc., and before namely.

    We insert a comma to add some extra information (aside elements), which does not form an essential part of the whole sentence.

    Everyone, except for those who don't, loves his films.

    To express contrasts:

    At the crack of dawn most people wake up, not go to bed.

    It was all about their personalities, not their neighbours.

    To avoid/remove ambiguity:

    Toast, and bacon, and eggs.

    Fancy salad, garlic, bread, and turkey?

    In long numbers:

    1,253,728.

    Between repeated words. That will make it clear that you did it on purpose:

    We really, really love outings.

    Before but we put comma only if it starts an independent clause.

    They want to venture into new markets, but the boss is not available at the moment to give them the thumbs up.



    Finished!


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    #10

    Re: Comma connecting ideas.


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