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    #1

    Noun Participle

    "A man named Walter Summerford was struck by lightning 3 times in his life" (This is a fact, though)
    Why do people used "Noun + Participle" as adjective? Is this for informal conversations?

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Noun Participle

    I take 'a man named Walter Summerford' to mean 'a man who was named Walter Summerford', where 'who was' can be omitted.

    Not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Noun Participle

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I take 'a man named Walter Summerford' to mean 'a man who was named Walter Summerford', where 'who was' can be omitted.

    Not a teacher.
    'A man who was named' sounds weird in a news. Thanks

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Noun Participle

    You are misunderstanding the structure. "A man [named Walter Summerford] was struck...".

    The adjectival phrase (participial) is "named Walter Summerford". It defines the noun "man".

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    #5

    Re: Noun Participle

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You are misunderstanding the structure. "A man [named Walter Summerford] was struck...".
    The adjectival phrase (participial) is "named Walter Summerford". It defines the noun "man".
    I was confused with no 'be' verb on there

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Noun Participle

    That's OK. You are learning.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Noun Participle

    1. 'A man who lived in the US was struck ...'
    2. 'A man living in the US was struck ...'
    Are they correct? Is 'living in the US' an adjectival participle phrase modifying the noun 'man' too?

    Quote Originally Posted by Checkmate View Post
    in a news
    I saw people write 'on the news' instead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Checkmate View Post
    'be' verb
    I saw people write 'the verb "to be"' instead.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 11-Oct-2014 at 14:04.

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