Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 34
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    ask

    Hi,
    Can someone please tell me that "difference between she asked you and she asked for you"

  1. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 223
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: ask

    "She asked you" means that she made an inquiry of you. She asked you a direct question - like, "What time is it?" or "Did you see The Walking Dead last night on TV?"

    "She asked for you" means that you were not immediately available and that she asked someone else to find you for her, or inquired as to your whereabouts. For example, at a clothing store sales counter: "Is Mary available? I spoke to her on the phone yesterday and she told me that she'd set aside one of those half-price designer sweaters for me." Or during a conversation among a group of coffee shop co-workers: "Hey, Bob - remember that really hot blonde that came in here last Friday? The one we were all flirting with? Well, she stopped by yesterday and she asked for you." Bob (not quite believing the story): "No way. Really?" "Really! I asked 'May I help you?' and she looked disappointed and said 'Isn't Bob working today?'"

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 34,336
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by balakrish View Post
    Hi.

    Can someone please tell me that the (no quotes required here) difference between "she asked you" and "she asked for you"?
    "She asked you" is an unlikely complete sentence, although not impossible. It is more likely to be something like "She asked you what your name is" or "She asked you if she could borrow your phone". In any case, it means that "she" spoke directly to "you" and asked a question or made a request.

    "She asked for you" means that "she" spoke to someone else and said something like "Do you know where XXX is?" (XXX = "you"). If I were looking for someone called Mr Brown, I might approach someone else and say "Have you seen Mr Brown?" or "Could you get Mr Brown for me please". In that instance, I would be asking for Mr Brown.

    If the person I spoke to was called Bob, then I could say "I asked Bob to contact Mr Brown for me" and "When I spoke to Bob, I asked for Mr Brown".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 11,825
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: ask

    To "ask for" someone could also mean that someone acted as someone else's proxy or delegate. Like you could not attend a meeting, but had someone go in your stead and ask the question that you wanted to be asked.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •