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    #1

    grammar

    Please confirm which one is correct.

    The NEFT form must be complete. It should not be empty.
    The NEFT form must be completed. It should not be empty.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: grammer

    I prefer the second. Note the correct spelling of "gramma​r".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: grammer

    Neither is good. There's a huge difference between a completed/complete form and an empty one.
    You want to ensure that no spaces are left empty (if you do). This can be done by saying "Please fill in ALL questions".

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    #4

    Re: grammer

    Is the first wrong?

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: grammer

    No.

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    #6

    Re: grammer

    Not a teacher

    yes, it's wrong if you want a correct writing.
    The verb be in any of its forms (am, is, are, was, were, be, been, being) can be followed by an other verb. this verb should be in the present participle or the past participle.
    - We are do* our homework. (should be are doing)
    - The homework was did* early. (should be was done)
    - Tom is take* the book. (should be is taking)
    - The book was took* by Tom. (should be was taken)
    be + 1) present participle
    2) past participle


    You were asking about should. whenever you see a model, such as: (will, would, shall, should, can, could, may, might, must) you should be sure that the verb that follows it is in its base form.
    - The boat will leaving*. (should be will leave)
    - The doctor may arrives* soon. (should be may arrive)
    - The students must taken* the exam. (should be must take)
    modal + main form of the verb

    in your situation, must + be + 1) completing
    2) completed
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 24-Oct-2014 at 15:23. Reason: Added "Not a teacher"

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: grammer

    Quote Originally Posted by fish-able View Post
    Yes, it's wrong if you want a correct piece of writing/if you want to write correctly.
    The verb "[to] be" in any of its forms (am, is, are, was, were, be, been, being) can be followed by an other another verb. This verb should be in the present participle or the past participle.

    - We are do* our homework. (should be are doing)
    - The homework was did* early. (should be was done)
    - Tom is take* the book. (should be is taking)
    - The book was took* by Tom. (should be was taken)
    be + 1) present participle
    2) past participle


    You were asking about "should". Whenever you see a model, such as: "will, would, shall, should, can, could, may, might, must", you should be make sure that the verb that follows it is in its base form.

    - The boat will leaving*. (should be will leave)
    - The doctor may arrives* soon. (should be may arrive)
    - The students must taken* the exam. (should be must take)
    modal + main form of the verb

    In your situation, must + be + 1) completing
    2) completed
    Fish-able, please see my corrections to your post above. It is admirable that you wish to help another learner but you need to make sure your writing is correct. The forum guidelines state that you must start your post with "Not a teacher" if you are responding to another learner's question. I have edited your post so that that appears at the start.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: grammer

    Quote Originally Posted by fish-able View Post
    Not a teacher

    yes, it's wrong if you want a correct writing.
    The verb be in any of its forms (am, is, are, was, were, be, been, being) can be followed by an other verb. this verb should be in the present participle or the past participle.
    - We are do* our homework. (should be are doing)
    - The homework was did* early. (should be was done)
    - Tom is take* the book. (should be is taking)
    - The book was took* by Tom. (should be was taken)
    be + 1) present participle
    2) past participle


    You were asking about should. whenever you see a model, such as: (will, would, shall, should, can, could, may, might, must) you should be sure that the verb that follows it is in its base form.
    - The boat will leaving*. (should be will leave)
    - The doctor may arrives* soon. (should be may arrive)
    - The students must taken* the exam. (should be must take)
    modal + main form of the verb

    in your situation, must + be + 1) completing
    2) completed
    No, you are wrong.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/complete?s=t

    "Complete" is an adjective. Definition 1 "having all parts or elements, lacking nothing."

    That fits in this context. It's the word I would choose.

    To me, "complete" emphasizes that all of the items on the form must be filled in. No blanks. No omissions.

    "Completed," to me, simply emphasizes that a person filled out the form to the best of his ability. The form is not blank. He is finished with the form.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: grammer

    Quote Originally Posted by fish-able View Post
    yes, it's wrong if you want a correct writing.
    I was really hoping we had crossed in posting when I said it was not wrong, then you said it was. You should make a habit of reading a thread first. This would prevent you from embarrassing yourself by disagreeing with regular commentators who know what they're talking about (usually).
    Both emsr2d2 and I had already suggested that it was not incorrect.
    Last edited by Raymott; 25-Oct-2014 at 21:14.

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    #10

    Re: grammar

    NABADIP, please note that a better title would have been The NEFT form must be complete/completed.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

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