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    #1

    "For 2 weeks "or "in 2 weeks"

    Hello, I am bewildered by "for a period of time" and "in a period of time".

    For instance, I want to say I am on a 2-week vacation. Should I say : " I don't have school for 2 weeks?" or " I don't have school in 2 weeks?"
    Could somebody explain the difference? Thank you !

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "For 2 weeks "or "in 2 weeks"

    "For two weeks" refers to the duration. "In two weeks" (in your context) means "after two weeks".

    Let's imagine that today is the 1st of August.

    I am on holiday for two weeks = I am on holiday from the 1st of August until the 14th of August.
    I am on holiday in two weeks = I will start my holiday on the 15th of August.

    As a general rule, when talking about time references, "for" means "for the duration of" or "lasting for a period of" and "in" means "after".

    So if you are currently taking a two-week holiday, you would say "I don't have school for two weeks!" or perhaps more naturally "I've got two weeks off school!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: "For 2 weeks "or "in 2 weeks"

    Thank you so much! It's very clear now.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 25-Oct-2014 at 15:06. Reason: Removed unnecessary quote.

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    #4

    Re: "For 2 weeks "or "in 2 weeks"

    Chriskwong, please note that there is no reason to write a new post to say "Thank you". Simply click on the "Thank" button in the bottom left-hand corner of any post you find helpful. It saves us all time.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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