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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    alligator!

    95)see you later, alligator!
    What does this "alligator" mean here as a greeting? A real animal or a nick name?

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: alligator!

    This is the title of a rock song from the '50's, recorded by Bill Haley and the Comets. It refers to a person, not an animal.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: alligator!

    So is it used as a greeting?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: alligator!

    - See you later, alligator!
    - In a while, crocodile!

    This is a relatively common way for people to say goodbye to each other in the UK. The first is frequently shortened to "Later, alligator".

    I had always assumed that the Bill Haley song was given that title because the phrase was already in use. Wikipedia suggests that the Bill Haley song was the first example of it, but this site seems to suggest that it was already a popular phrase and was then picked up for the song title.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: alligator!

    Do you use this only to friends or anyone like seniors as well?

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    #6

    Re: alligator!

    It's very dated. I don't use it at all.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: alligator!

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Do you use this only to friends or anyone like seniors as well?
    I'm not sure what you mean by "seniors". To me, that means "older people" - in the UK "old age pensioners" or people who are over 60/65. I have plenty of friends who are older people. Did you mean people who are deemed to be more important than me (not a distinction I tend to make)?
    I would use it with anyone I feel comfortable with and who I think will understand it. Given that the song we mentioned came out in the 1950s, it's actually possible that more older people would understand it than younger people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's very dated. I don't use it at all.
    Perhaps my "relatively common" should have been "widely recognised". I admit I probably haven't used it more than once in the last couple of years but I don't know anyone who wouldn't recognise it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: alligator!

    Both parts are used because they rhyme: later and gator; while and dile.

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