Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Harum30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 10
    #1

    A problem with fraction

    I got very confused how to read fraction, my teacher said that 5/7 is read five-seventh, then I tried to search it by myself and I found this thread
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...read-fractions
    in that thread, it's said that
    3/8 --------> Three eighths

    13/18 -------> Thirteen eighteenths

    24/26 --------> Twenty-four twenty-sixths
    I showed this thread to my teacher but he just said that he never heard it, then I showed it to my friends but they're also taught that there's no -s ending for the denominator. I'm from Indonesia and English is the second language here, so can you give me some suggestions about how to convince my teacher and friends about how to read fraction properly? Please correct me if I'm wrong, I will be very happy because I'm highly motivated to know more and more about English.

    Thank you

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,453
    #2

    Re: A problem with fraction

    The readings in your quote box are absolutely correct.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #3

    Re: A problem with fraction

    Any fraction which starts with a 1 takes no "s" at the end.

    1/16 = one sixteenth
    1/8 = one eighth
    1/4 = one/a quarter
    1/2 = one/a half

    If the fraction starts with anything over 1, it takes an "s" at the end.

    2/3 = two thirds
    3/4 = three quarters
    7/8 = seven eighths
    5/16 = five sixteenths

    This makes perfect sense logically. "One" of something is singular. Any more than one becomes plural.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Harum30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Indonesian
      • Home Country:
      • Indonesia
      • Current Location:
      • Indonesia

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 10
    #4

    Re: A problem with fraction

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Any fraction which starts with a 1 takes no "s" at the end.

    1/16 = one sixteenth
    1/8 = one eighth
    1/4 = one/a quarter
    1/2 = one/a half

    If the fraction starts with anything over 1, it takes an "s" at the end.

    2/3 = two thirds
    3/4 = three quarters
    7/8 = seven eighths
    5/16 = five sixteenths

    This makes perfect sense logically. "One" of something is singular. Any more than one becomes plural.
    Thank you for your explanation.
    So, does that rule exist both in American and British English?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: A problem with fraction

    Yes, it does.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,453
    #6

    Re: A problem with fraction

    Thank you for your help Please don't use a smiley to replace the correct punctuation mark.
    Harum30, there is no need to write a new post just to say "Thank you". It makes us think there is new information or a follow-up question and we spend time opening the thread. Simply click on the "Thank" button at the bottom left-hand corner of any post you find helpful.

    It saves everybody's time.

    Last edited by Rover_KE; 30-Oct-2014 at 09:07.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #7

    Re: A problem with fraction

    Quote Originally Posted by Harum30 View Post
    so can you give me some suggestions about how to convince my teacher and friends about how to read fraction properly?
    Ask them to show native speakers that agree with their position. This thread, and others, all have native speakers, from different variants, who say that this is the system they use. No education system is perfect,so it is possible that this has crept into what is taught in Indonesia, but when the speech community says one thing and another thing is taught as a second language, it is not the speech community that is wrong.

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #8

    Re: A problem with fraction

    On the other hand, if that's the way it's taught in Indonesia, it'll generate more heat than light if an individual insists on being 'the only one in step'.
    I'm not sure it does a lot of good to correct a usage that is well established and widely used and understood in a speech community. Native speakers can say what they know to be true, but that doesn't mean that speakers of ESOL/EFL have to adopt it into their own speech habits,

    My Ji gong teacher (a Czech, but with many ELF contacts in China) refers to one exercise as 'Pulling nine oxens'. The first time I heard it, I corrected her. She's not stupid, and I gave the analogy of 'children' - which she understood. But she didn't change, and it would be plain rude if I just kept correcting her.

    b

  6. lotus888's Avatar
    Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2014
    • Posts: 417
    #9

    Re: A problem with fraction

    It is "A problem with fractions".



    --lotus

Similar Threads

  1. 3/4 degree (fraction)
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 17-May-2014, 12:32
  2. the ver in the fraction
    By WUKEN in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-May-2009, 19:55
  3. a major fraction
    By moniza in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Nov-2008, 06:30
  4. Fraction
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2007, 09:49
  5. fraction
    By catie in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Jun-2003, 21:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •