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  1. Geunsely's Avatar
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    #1

    Question have the good grace to blush

    What does this idiom mean?
    have the good grace to blush

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have the good grace to blush

    I wouldn't call that an idiom.

    Do you know what "to blush" means? Do you know what we mean by "have the good grace to" or simply "good grace"? What did you find when you looked them up online?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: have the good grace to blush

    "Have the good grace to blush" indicates that the person referred to has knowingly said something inappropriate or risque. Said person has spoken out of turn and could possibly socially redeem herself by silently admitting to her faux pas by blushing as though she is embarrassed by her remark.

    For example, "Princess Diana told a group of friends at a party that Prince Charles preferred to be called 'Sir' when they were in bed together. It was a most unseemly remark, but at least she had the good grace to blush when she said it."

    (I've used the feminine pronoun in this case because it is usually women who blush when they are embarrassed.)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: have the good grace to blush

    Geunsely, be aware that you were very lucky this time - Jill Dorchester chose to answer your question before you had taken the opportunity to show us what your own research had shown. Don't get used to that! We always expect you to tell us what you think and what you have found before we just give you the answer on a plate!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: have the good grace to blush

    ...and 'on a plate' is an idiom.

    b

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    #6

    Re: have the good grace to blush

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Geunsely:

    Ms. Dorchester has given us all an excellent interpretation of that expression.

    I THINK that there are other interpretations, too.

    Here is what I read in an Australian newspaper (online):

    "Tell a friend,'This apricot slice is delicious,' and don't be surprised if you get a blush of embarrassment [my emphasis] and a mumbled disclaimer, 'Um thanks -- it's not my best effort. A bit dry, don't you think?' " -- The Courier-Mail (03/24/2014).

    Based on that quotation (and on this one from the novel Death Comes from the Past by Raymond Dale in the "books" section of Google: "Edwina still had the good grace to blush [my emphasis] after a compliment"), I THINK that this dialogue shows another interpretation:

    Mona: You are extremely handsome and extremely intelligent.
    James: No! No! No! There are a million men who are more handsome and more intelligent than I am.

    Raul (the next day): I heard you speaking with Mona yesterday. I congratulate you on having the good grace to blush when she complimented you so highly.
    James: What do you mean?
    Raul: I mean that you had the good manners to act embarrassed.



    James
    Last edited by TheParser; 30-Oct-2014 at 12:32. Reason: spacing; added missing pronoun.

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