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    #1

    Guidance to convert / Expand phrases to Clauses

    Respected teacher,

    I have some doubts in expanding the Phrases to clauses. Could you please guide me in this? I do understand that a Clause has an subject and a predicate and the phrase does not have. The following sentences which are underlined are phrases and I need to expand it to a clause. I am at my wits end as to how I should proceed further.

    1. She is an intelligent girl.
    2. Inspite of being ill, the student attended the classes.
    3. People living in Glass houses cannot throw stones at others.

    My understanding of the above:
    1. Mary is an intelligent girls (Mary is the Subject -- Is an intelligent girls is the predicate. hence it is a clause)
    2.The student attended the classes inspite of his illness (Subject: The Student; Predicate: attended the classes...)
    3. Stones cannot be thrown by people living in glass houses.

    I have my own doubts. I am not sure whether they are correct or not.

    Kindly help /guide me in this.

    Thanks and regards.

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    #2

    Re: Guidance to convert / Expand phrases to Clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravi_Mangalore View Post
    The following sentences which are underlined are phrases and I need to expand it to a clause. 2. In spite of being ill, the student attended the classes.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Mr. Mangalore:

    I believe that sentence could be changed to:


    "Although she was ill, the student attended classes."

    "Although she was ill" is a subordinate clause because it depends on the main clause ("The student attended classes") to make sense.


    James


    P.S. Your sentence did not specify the gender of the student. In 2014, when we do not know the gender of a person, we can refer to that person by either the male or female pronoun. I decided to use "she."

    Compare: Although Raul was ill, he attended classes. / Although Maria was ill, she attended classes. / Although he was ill, Raul attended classes. / Although she was ill, Maria attended classes.

    P.P.S. We can say "in spite of" or "despite."

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    #3

    Re: Guidance to convert / Expand phrases to Clauses

    Dear Mr. James, Thank you very much for your prompt and courteous Reply. There is no gender mentioned because if you observe the word used is student. "Inspite of being ill, the student attended the classes. Hence as per your instruction it will be although the student was ill he/she attended the classes. Am I right? but then Mr James sir, can we change the entire sentence by adding new words like "although", he/she" etc? Will this sentence be not right ---- The student attended the classes inspite of being ill". Here the subject is "The Student" and the Predicate is "attended the Classes inspite of being ill".

    Kindly Clarify.

    Thanks and Regards


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    #4

    Re: Guidance to convert / Expand phrases to Clauses

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Mr. Mangalore:

    May I comment on your spelling of "in spite of"? To the best of my knowledge, the words "in" and "spite" are not spelled together -- at least in American English.

    Regarding your excellent question regarding the placement of "in spite of being ill," we non-teacher members are allowed to comment only if we are reasonably confident -- which I am not.

    Hopefully, a teacher will soon give you (and me) the answer.



    James

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    #5

    Re: Guidance to convert / Expand phrases to Clauses

    In spite of ...
    Despite ...
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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