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    #1

    "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    What's the meaning that I underlined in red?

    1.involved a drunken driver
    2.being involved a drunken driver

    Two years ago, 48% of all crash fatalities during Halloweeninvolved a drunken driver or being involved a drunken driver, compared with 31% on an average day in the same year, according to the agency's most recent data.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    The part in red doesn't make sense. Note that you haven't "underlined" it in red. This is an underlined word. This is simply a word in red.

    I can't find the words you quoted on the page you gave a link to. There is no mention of 48% of crash fatalities.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The part in red doesn't make sense. Note that you haven't "underlined" it in red. This is an underlined word. This is simply a word in red.

    I can't find the words you quoted on the page you gave a link to. There is no mention of 48% of crash fatalities.
    You can find it on that sentence.

    There are two answers above-mentioned that you can skip another sentence.For example, you can write down number 1 answer on that sentence or choose number 2 on that sentence.

    Something like that,
    1. Two years ago, 48% of all crash fatalities during Halloween involved a drunken driver, compared with 31% on an average day in the same year, according to the agency's most recent data.

    2. Two years ago, 48% of all crash fatalities during Halloween being involved a drunken driver, compared with 31% on an average day in the same year, according to the agency's most recent data.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    48% of all crash fatalities during Halloween involved a drunken driver,
    The construction is 'something involved someone', which should be correct.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 01-Nov-2014 at 12:12.

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    #5

    Re: "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    Anyone help me?

  3. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "involved a drunken driver" VS "being involved a drunken driver"

    Here is the original quote as I found it in a CNN news report:

    Two years ago, 48% of all crash fatalities during Halloween involved a drunken driver, compared with 31% on an average day in the same year, according to the agency's most recent data.

    The quote in your original post:
    Two years ago, 48% of all crash fatalities during Halloweeninvolved a drunken driver or being involved a drunken driver, compared with 31% on an average day in the same year, according to the agency's most recent data. does not make sense as written. Where did the "or being involved a drunken driver" come from? Or are you inserting your own words and asking if they are the same as "involved a drunken driver"?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 01-Nov-2014 at 19:42. Reason: Enlarging font size.

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