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  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #1

    'There he was' VS 'There was nothing'.

    This Chinese page says that the verb in the inverted sentence below remains after the subject because 'he' is a pronoun.
    'There he was.'

    In the sentence below, the verb is put before 'nothing' which is also a pronoun. Is it because 'nothing' is the object?
    'There was nothing.'
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 02-Nov-2014 at 13:58.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'There he was' VS 'There was nothing'.

    I am not a teacher.

    This is similar to this other thread.

    'There he was' means 'he was there/in the place referred to'.

    'There was nothing' means that nothing existed. It has nothing to do with place.

    'There is' and 'there are' and all conjugations thereof are about existence and reality, not location.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'There he was' VS 'There was nothing'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    It has nothing to do with place.
    'There was something in the box.'
    'There he was in the room.'
    They have to do with places now. Why is 'was' before 'something' but after 'he'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    This is similar to this other thread.
    I did not want to hijack the other thread, so I started this thread.

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