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    #1

    Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you let th

    Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you let them copy, of course?

    The first sentence says ‘your friend’, but the second sentence uses ‘them’. Why does the writer say so? Can I also use ‘him or her’ instead of ‘them’?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you le

    Many people use the plural pronoun when the gender of the person is unknown. "He or she" is an alternative. But the end of your sentence is unclear. What does "of course" mean?

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    #3

    Re: Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you le

    Thanks, Mike.
    I'm not sure of the meaning of ‘of course’ here either. I read the two sentences in English in Mind3, British English edition, Cambridge University Press. They are part of a questionnaire.

    Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you:
    a) tell your teacher – you can’t let friends copy like that?
    b) let them copy, of course?
    c) refuse, but offer to help your friend to do their own work?

    Personally, I think that ‘of course’ means ‘directly’ or ‘without hesitation’. Am I right?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you le

    In that context, it means that you should let you friend copy.

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    #5

    Re: Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you le

    diamondcutter, I expect you know that's not the right option to choose.

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    #6

    Re: Your friend asks to borrow your homework for the second time in a week. Do you le

    Thanks for you reminding, Rover. I know that's not right. I just talk about the grammar.

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