Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 34
    #1

    got to say

    Hi.
    In what context I should use " I got to say " and " I want to say ". Someone tell me with suitable examples.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: got to say

    Please post your own sentences containing those phrases.

  2. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 223
    #3

    Re: got to say

    First of all, the proper phrase is "I've got to say", or "I have got to say." (The present perfect tense is required in this case.)

    "I've got to say" means that the speaker feels very firmly in what he is stating. He is absolute in his conviction.

    Examples: "I've got to say that this is the best birthday present I've ever received!"
    "I've got to say that you're wrong - Daryl Dixon is the best character on The Walking Dead. He can hunt, he can track, and he's totally hot, too."
    "I've got to say that unless we reduce our labor costs, our company will lose money in the next quarter. Our competitors are importing products from countries with no minimum wage laws."

    Depending upon the context, "I want to say" can indicate that the speaker is unsure of his facts when he is expressing an opinion.

    Examples: Question: "What day did you move into that house?" Answer: "I want to say May 30, but I'd have to check my calendar to be sure. I know it was around Memorial Day."

    Or a speaker could use "I want to say" as a preface for some further opinions or thoughts he is going to express...

    Examples: (Recipient of an award, speaking from a podium): "I want to say 'thank you' for this honor. I could not have accomplished this without the assistance of a great many people...."

    (Member of a committee that is about to vote on an issue): "I want to say that I think we're making a big mistake if we close the public libraries on Saturdays."

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: got to say

    Is there any reason you decided not to wait for the OP to respond?

  4. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 223
    #5

    Re: got to say

    My post crossed with yours; when I started typing, your post wasn't yet up. Sorry.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: got to say

    OK.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,805
    #7

    Re: got to say

    Cross-posting aside, it's always a good idea for the first responder to encourage the OP to make their own sentences, rather than handing out an answer. For future reference.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •