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    #1

    Word meaning

    I don't know the meaning of butt kiss in this sentence:

    If I don't butt kiss, I might get fired. It's so stressful living like this

    Please help me.

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    #2

    Re: Word meaning

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Tuan:

    You do not want to use this expression. It is very vulgar.

    "Butt" refers to the buttocks. You know what "kiss" means. So ...

    When people use this expression, they do NOT actually mean what they say.

    It is a vulgar way to say that you flatter someone because you want something. In the case of your example, you want that job, so you have to express praise to your boss -- even if you do not really believe what you are saying:

    Oh, sir, I like your suit today. You have such perfect taste in clothes.
    Yes, ma'am, I absolutely agree with everything that you say. You are never wrong!
    Mr. Smith, let me know if there is anything (anything!) that I can do for you or your family. It's my privilege to serve you.
    Ms. Jones, that report that you gave to us yesterday was the best thing that I have ever heard in my whole life. You are a jewel!



    James

    P.S. I think that most people usually say the word "kiss" first: "If I don't kiss butt, I'll lose that job."
    Last edited by TheParser; 05-Nov-2014 at 17:15. Reason: I added a P.S.

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    #3

    Re: Word meaning

    tuan, please note that a better title would have been Butt kiss.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Word meaning

    The phrase isn't used in BrE. This is because we don't use "butt" to mean "bottom". The phrase in BrE is "kiss arse" (I believe that's "kiss ass" in AmE). The word order we use is the same as TheParser mentioned at the end of his post.

    If I don't kiss arse, I won't get a promotion.
    To get a promotion here, you need to kiss arse.
    I don't like him. He's an arse-kisser.

    We also use "arse-licker".

    I haven't put any asterisks in the word "arse" because, vulgar though it may be, very few people consider it to be actual swearing. This does not mean you should use it in polite company or in a formal situation. It's fine between friends and work colleagues with whom you have a friendly relationship.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Word meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    (I believe that's "kiss ass" in AmE).
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Yes, I do believe that many (most?) Americans would use the word "ass" instead of "butt": "If you want a promotion around here, you really have to kiss ass."

    It is only my opinion that "butt" sounds a bit less vulgar than "ass."


    In fact, there is a word in American English that starts with "ass" ("ass####"). It means "a contemptible person." Even in 2014 America, that word is still a taboo at school, at work, and on regular television.


    James

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    #6

    Re: Word meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post

    We also use "arse-licker".

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Oh, my!

    That reminds me of a somewhat similar American term: "He's risen to the top of the company by being a total #####noser."

    (The deleted letters refer to a certain color.)


    James

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    #7

    Re: Word meaning

    Yes. We use "to brown-nose" and "brown-noser" too. Not in formal situations but we all know what it means.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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