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    #1

    Lightbulb What is the meaning of "head off" in this sentence?

    Hey guys, hope you are doing great.

    As you can read in the title, my question is about the meaning of "head off" here.
    it's from the movie called "A walk among tombstones" starring "Liam Neeson".
    Here is the context:

    B: You need some help man
    A: OH, God
    B. I don't Care
    B. You wanna mess up your own sh*t?
    B. But you're gonna mess up mine too.
    B. I need you to look out my back.
    B. that you're gonna come falling through the door behind me.
    A. Don't worry your pretty little ... head off.

    (Both of them are cops).

    I just don't get the meaning of last sentence.

    I surfed the net about the meaning of head off as a phrasal verb but I think here it's used as a noun or something?

    Thanks in advance,


    Last edited by emsr2d2; 09-Nov-2014 at 21:35. Reason: Standardised font size to make it all readable. Added asterisk to swear word.

  1. Jill Dorchester's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What is the meaning of "head off" in this sentence?

    First of all, one of the mods should post a NSFW warning in your subject line, due to the cursing and the ethnic slur. "Don't worry your _____ head" is an AmE expression that simply means the same thing as "don't worry." Quite commonly a male will say to a female in a demeaning tone "Don't worry your pretty little head". In this case the person worrying is of Latin-American or Hispanic heritage, as "spick" is a derogatory term for that ethnic group. Please don't ever use it in casual conversation.

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    #3

    Re: What is the meaning of "head off" in this sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jill Dorchester View Post
    First of all, one of the mods should post a NSFW warning in your subject line, due to the cursing and the ethnic slur. "Don't worry your _____ head" is an AmE expression that simply means the same thing as "don't worry." Quite commonly a male will say to a female in a demeaning tone "Don't worry your pretty little head". In this case the person worrying is of Latin-American or Hispanic heritage, as "spick" is a derogatory term for that ethnic group. Please don't ever use it in casual conversation.
    Dear Friend, first of all thank you so much for answering.
    Second of all, I really did not mean to insult anyone or any ethnics, I just thought that is means "a person from a Spanish-speaking country".
    besides, I just said what I heard in the movie, just this.
    I edited my post by the way.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What is the meaning of "head off" in this sentence?

    Thank you for editing out the ethnic slur. It's a word you should avoid. I have also edited the swear (curse) word by adding an asterisk in place of the "i". That is a standard way to write a swear word on this forum. Native speakers will always recognise which word it is and you won't have had to actually write the word in full.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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