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    #1

    not always and unnecessarily

    "He is not always a bad person."
    "He is unnecessarily bad person."

    Are both same?

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    #2

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    Only the first makes sense.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    The second would be better as "He is not necessarily a bad person."
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 11-Nov-2014 at 09:19. Reason: added "a"

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    #4

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    He is not necessarily a bad person.

    not a teacher

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    There's no relation between 'always' and 'necessarily' as the original post seems to imply.

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    #6

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dic...us/necessarily

    If you scroll to "necessarily" in other languages, it says that BrE also use "necessarily" to mean "not always".

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    No, it says that we sometimes use "not necessarily" to mean "not always true". That's not the same as "not always".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No, it says that we sometimes use "not necessarily" to mean "not always true". That's not the same as "not always".
    Is it natural to say "I was necessarily a kind person." instead of saying "I used to be a kind person."

  4. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    No. They have different meanings. The first tells us that you were a kind person because of some requirement or obligation. The second sentence says that you were a kind person in the past, but no longer are.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: not always and unnecessarily

    No. You are, unfortunately, totally misunderstanding the use of "not necessarily". We don't use "necessarily" in the same way at all. I suggest you study the use of "not necessarily" for a few days.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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