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    #1

    Bull-riding

    Hello all,


    English subtitle excerpt from the movie 'A night in old Mexico' (2013)


    Scene: Grandson and Grandfather in the front-seat of a car with two hitchhikers in the back-seat.
    The grandson is showing off about his bull-riding skills.
    The grandfather is embarrassed and takes a sideswipe at him.




    Grandson - I tell you this.

    Grandson - Yeah, he was a mean one... (the bull)
    Grandson - Oh yes sir. You put hair and horn on a stick of dynamite, you get the idea.
    Grandfather - Christ sakes. (mumbling)
    Passenger- You rode him now, huh?
    Grandfather - Yeah, a buckaroo like him, had a rod and pick in his nose in one hand
    Grandfather - and scratches his little red hiney with the other.
    What I understood of the last sentence is that riding a mad bull is no problem for a cowboy as good as his grandson, he even is able to do other things while riding it.


    But, for Christ sakes, what does “had a rod and pick in his nose in one hand” mean ?

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Bull-riding

    Quote Originally Posted by Mahi93 View Post
    But, for Christ sakes, what does “had a rod and pick in his nose in one hand” mean ?
    It seems that it would be very uncomfortable.


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    #3

    Re: Bull-riding

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    It seems that it would be very uncomfortable.

    Now you're making me even more curious

    I can deduct it will be something not nice to say, but the construction of the sentence seems so odd to me.
    How can one have 'a pick in his nose' in his hand?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bull-riding

    First of all, there is no reason to use phrases like "for Christ's sake" with us. It's offensive to some, including me.

    I expect it's a mis-transcription. I expect the grandfather was saying he was picking his nose with one hand and scratching his butt with the other. I have no idea what "the rod" is supposed to be unless he is suggesting that he was also (pardon the crudeness) masturbating.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Bull-riding

    First of all, there is no reason to use phrases like "for Christ's sake" with us. It's offensive to some, including me.
    So sorry, I definitely had no intension to offend someone.
    I just wanted to emphasize that I, with the best will in the world, couldn't make any sense of what was written.
    Please consider that something may sound wrong in native ears without us even having the slightest idea that we could have said something offensive.

    I expect it's a mis-transcription. I expect the grandfather was saying he was picking his nose with one hand and scratching his butt with the other. I have no idea what "the rod" is supposed to be unless he is suggesting that he was also (pardon the crudeness) masturbating.
    Thank you, this makes sense.
    Now I can continue the translation of the subtitling into Flemish for my wife.
    I'll soften the expressions a bit for her ears too

    EDIT:
    I want to apologize again for using the expression.
    I consulted my dictionary and you are so right, it is considered ‘rude’

    for Christ's sake (rude) also for Christ sakes
    In Flemish we have the same expression (In Godsnaam) which is frequently used to emphasize something, nothing rude about it in our ears.
    But I promise never to use it again in English
    Last edited by Mahi93; 15-Nov-2014 at 09:10.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Bull-riding

    I think it's a bad translation of something like: He could ride picking his nose with one hand and scratching his hiney with the other.

    In the southwestern U.S., some people pronounce ride differently than other English-speakers, and it might sound like rod or rad to a non-native speaker. They sometimes also add the uh sound in front of ing verbs that start with consonants. We spell that this way: a-. Many Americans also drop the g in ing. We spell that in'.

    So a-ridin' might have sounded like a rod and to the translator.

    Does that make sense?
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 01-Apr-2015 at 00:29.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Bull-riding

    PS - As you probably know, there are many, many English-language accents. Sometimes we can't even understand each other!

    Here's the American comedian Robin Williams talking about his trip to Scotland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i4ib77GaV0

    He could not understand what his Scottish guide was saying. It was like hearing a foreign language. The joke is that while his Scottish accent is excellent, he's not saying any real words - just nonsense.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #8

    Re: Bull-riding

    Hello Charlie,

    Does that make sense?
    Yes Charlie it does, thank you.

    I normally can follow the English dialogs in a movie but when the accent, urban sayings or slang become too overwhelming I need the English subtitling for the hearing impaired.
    Also when people are mumbling or rattling I often have difficulties understanding.

    (Jimmy, on the other hand, him I begin to understand better and better, thanks to you.)
    English is not my native tongue, please don’t slap me when something that I wrote sounds wrong.
    It makes me crawl into a corner and stay there, in fetus position, for at least a week.

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    #9

    Re: Bull-riding

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    PS - As you probably know, there are many, many English-language accents. Sometimes we can't even understand each other!
    As do we!

    I think it is even worse here. Accents and words differ from town to town, sometimes even from street to street.
    A lot of elderly people only speak their particular dialect. When these people are interviewed on TV the program is subtitled.

    We, at home we speak official Dutch with the kids and Flemish-Dutch or a kind of polished dialect when they’re not around.


    Here, in the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium, when you want to go white collar you need to master the official Dutch language and you got to have a good working knowledge of French, English and German.


    Here's the American comedian Robin Williams talking about his trip to Scotland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i4ib77GaV0

    Hilarious! Thanks for the link.


    I’ve seen a lot of his movies but I’d never seen him as a stand-up comedian. Great performer!

    I googled a bit more about the subject and came to the conclusion that I’ve still a lot of watching to do.
    English is not my native tongue, please don’t slap me when something that I wrote sounds wrong.
    It makes me crawl into a corner and stay there, in fetus position, for at least a week.

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Bull-riding

    Enjoy!

    =O]

    cb
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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