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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    spins a line

    29) Check it out: every night millions sit glued to the TV as some news anchor spins a line about the latest natural disaster or world conflict or violent crime.

    What does this "spins a line " mean? Is it an idiom?

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: spins a line

    Yes. It basically means "talks about". It's generally used to imply that someone is trying to influence his/her audience about something. For example: "He was spinning a line about the latest natural disaster being caused by global warning". Thus, PR people who represent political parties are often referred to as "spin doctors".
    You may also hear the expression "to spin a yarn" about something. On the face of it, this simply means to tell a story about something. However, it is often used to imply that the story is not true, or is exaggerated in some way.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: spins a line

    Doesn't it have the meaning of "talk eloquently,or ramble on"? The definition goes likes this in my material, confusing me.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: spins a line

    It certainly doesn't mean "to talk eloquently" to me. I suppose an argument could be made for "to ramble on" but there is definitely a nuance of difference. Someone could ramble on for ages about a story which is entirely true and with which they are not trying to influence the hearer's opinion. If they're spinning a line about that story, it sounds a little more nefarious.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: spins a line

    "Spin" is to put the best possible interpretation on events/news. It's what politicians and such do.

    A less charitable definition of "spin" is "lying," but it is more nuanced than simple falsehood.

    If someone used "spin" and didn't mean to imply this definition, then they chose the wrong word.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/spin?s=t See definition 22

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