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    #1

    can't offord to take a chance

    When we say "someone can't afford to take a chance that something will happen", does it mean that they can't afford to the consequences of something will happen or something will not happen.
    two examples:
    1.We can't offord to take a chance that he'll be on the next plane.
    2.Salon owner Constance Garnett says she can't afford to take a chance that unrest will crash head on into the business she built here for the past 11 years.

    Thanks.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: can't offord to take a chance

    They can't afford the consequences should that thing happen.
    They can't afford the consequences of that thing happening.
    That is more obvious in 2.

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    #3

    Re: can't offord to take a chance

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    They can't afford the consequences should that thing happen.
    They can't afford the consequences of that thing happening.
    That is more obvious in 2.
    But when we say "somebody wants to take a chance", does it not mean that he/she wants the thing that he/she takes a chance on to happen, though it's risky ?

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    #4

    Re: can't offord to take a chance

    No, not by itself. It depends on the context, and how that phrase is expressed. It's usually obvious what the person wants to happen.

    Consider these examples:
    1."I'm willing to take a chance on love." One would assume that this person wants to fall in love, even though it's not stated that way.
    2. "I'll take a chance on horse number 11." Again, you'd assume that this person wants horse 11 to win.
    That is, yes, the person wants whatever they are "taking a chance on" to happen.

    But:
    A: I love racing motorbikes.
    B: That's dangerous. You could fall off and die
    A: I'll take that chance.
    Here, A doesn't mean that we wants to fall off and die, even though he expresses that as the chance. In this case, 'the chance' is 'the risk'.
    Same as in "I know I might catch Ebola. That's a chance I'll have to take."

    Do you have any actual sentences about taking chances where you can't tell what the speaker would like to happen? If so, post them. It would be easier to explain.

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