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    #1

    Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Are both ''There'll be along a bus in a couple of minuts'', ''There'll be a bus along in a couple of minuts'' correct?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Only the second works.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Note the correct spelling of minute​s".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    But why can't, in this case, the first one be used? Can't I speak and write ''The dog was running beside me along'' because the adverb accompanies a verb? And there's a rule about not putting and adverb between the object and verb, right?
    Last edited by guilhermehm; 23-Nov-2014 at 19:42.

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    #5

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Quote Originally Posted by guilhermehm View Post
    But why can't, in this case, the first one be used?
    Because the grammar is wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by guilhermehm View Post
    Can't I speak and write ''The dog was running beside me along'' because the adverb accompanies a verb?
    No, not grammatically.

    Quote Originally Posted by guilhermehm View Post
    And there's a rule about not putting and adverb between the object and verb, right?
    No. Not the way you are applying it anyway.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    In this context, the verb is "to run along" and the location is "beside me".

    What was the dog doing?
    The dog was running along.

    Where was he doing it?
    Beside me.

    The dog was running along beside me.

    In fact, "along" is unnecessary there. The dog was running beside me.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Quote Originally Posted by guilhermehm View Post
    But why can't, in this case, the first one be used?
    It's hard to give a reason for something like word position. We learn where the word goes by following the patterns that other people use when we're acquiring our first language. If something follows a fixed pattern, we follow that and it sounds strange if someone doesn't. So, the reason we do it is because everybody else is doing it. Some languages put the verb after the subject and others put the verb at the end; it's wrong to switch these patterns as they won't work in the other language. Languages need patterns so that they can be accepted and understood by the speech community. It may not sound like much of an explanation to say you shouldn't do something because no one else does it, but it is often how things work. Some adverbs can jump around, but others can't. up:

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    #8

    Re: Is there any certain position in a phrase for adverbs as ''along''?l

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In fact, "along" is unnecessary there.
    Unnecessary, but it's OK to use it.

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