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    #1

    Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Do you want to try the biscuit.
    Would you like to have a biscuit.


    My friend and I went to David house.
    David prepared many desserts and snacks on the table.
    I asked my friend to have a try for the biscuit.
    In this situation, should I used "Do you..." or "Would you..."?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Do you want a biscuit?
    Would you like a biscuit?
    Would you like to try a biscuit?
    How about a biscuit?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonree123456 View Post
    Do you want to try the biscuit?
    Would you like to have a biscuit?


    My friend and I went to David's house.
    David had laid out many desserts and snacks on the table.
    I asked my friend to have a try a biscuit.
    In this situation, should I have used "Do you..." or "Would you..."?
    Please note my amendments to your text.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Also, note that biscuits in AusE and BrE are what AmE calls 'cookies'. Their biscuits are our scones.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 24-Nov-2014 at 15:55. Reason: Deleting (?) around 'and BrE'.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Our biscuits are not really your scones... but I understood the post to refer to "cookies."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Our biscuits are not really your scones... but I understood the post to refer to "cookies."
    So, what exactly are your biscuits? I'm sure it was here that someone said they were scones - a few years back. Maybe your scones are something else.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    Our scones are your scones - we don't have our own scones.
    Your scones are CLOSE to what we call "English muffins" but once you've had real scones, they are a poor comparison.
    Our biscuits are flour and baking powder - cut in some butter, and mix with milk until smooth. Knead, then cut into rounds and bake. There are no eggs in biscuits. I don't know that you have an equivalent, do you?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Do you want to try the biscuit.

    I'm not sure, not being a cook. I guess there's information below for anyone who really needs to know.
    America: "Round British scones can resemble North American biscuits in appearance, but scones traditionally rely on cold butter, while biscuits are more often made with other kinds of animal fat or vegetable shortening.[7] Also, while scones are frequently (but not always) sweet, and served with coffee and tea, biscuits are served more as a bread, often with breakfast in the South"
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scone

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