Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Ireland
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Nov 2014
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Thumbs up "For" or "In"?

    I have a little preposition problem that has been bugging me for the past few days

    If you were writing the sentence "he sang a song for his audition," would it be correct to use "for his audition" or "in his audition"?
    Last edited by Amelia79; 25-Nov-2014 at 20:17.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,838
    #2

    Re: "For" or "In"?

    I'd use "He sang a song at his audition".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #3

    Re: "For" or "In"?

    If you say "he sang a song for his audition" I think you are telling me that he sang, as opposed to dancing, or playing the kazoo, or spinning plates.

  2. Newbie
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Nov 2014
    • Posts: 1
    #4

    Re: "For" or "In"?

    Two of the three prepositions used in this sentence convey a slightly different meaning. If you say that "he sang for his audition" you are saying that his audition consisted of singing and nothing else (limitation). It is also what he did for the sake of his audition, thus emphasizing purpose as well. This sentence additionally implies that he may have had a choice of doing other things for his audition, but that he chose to sing for it rather than do anything else. However, if you say that "he sang at his audition" you are simply telling about something that he did during the time of his audition, without emphasizing purpose and without implying that he decided to sing instead of doing something else. Additionally, this statement does not limit his activity. It leaves open the possibility that he might have done other things at his audition in addition to singing. Using "in" would have the same meaning as using "at," but I agree with the moderator that "at" would be the preferred usage. "He sang in his audition" strikes me as less than idiomatic!

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] Are "Perform", "Carry out", "Fulfill" and "Implement" synonyms?
    By xxwzs in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 30-Sep-2014, 07:33
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2012, 04:23
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Jul-2012, 19:53
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Jun-2012, 17:55
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •