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  1. qiye3322's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
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      • China
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      • Japan

    • Join Date: May 2014
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    #1

    Usage of as

    In his 25 years of research, one group of people has come to stand out as decidedly more likely than others to push boundaries.

    Is highlighted clause a adverbial clause?

    Can i say In his 25 years of research, one group of people has come to stand out with decidedly more likely than others to push boundaries? what is the difference or this sentence do not make sense?

    Please give me some examples using as with same meaning and some explanations.


    Thanks.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 26-Nov-2014 at 14:34. Reason: Deleting multiple totally unnecessary exclamation marks.

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    #2

    Re: Usage of as

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Qiye:

    May I share some thoughts (not "answers")? With your permission, I shall simplify the sentence for easier analysis.

    1. I am 99.99% confident that "One group stands out with more likely to push the boundaries" is not acceptable to native speakers.

    2. I believe that "One group stands out as more likely to push the boundaries" is acceptable to most native speakers.

    3. I believe that for a complete analysis of that sentence, there is one word that is actually missing: "One group stands out as being more likely to push the boundaries."

    4. When one adds the "being," then it is clearer that "as (being) more likely to push the boundaries" is not an adverbial clause. I do not have the confidence to label it, but I do have the confidence to say that "as (being) more likely to push the boundaries" is being used as a subjective complement. That is to say, it refers to the subject "group."



    James


    P.S. Compare: "Many people consider that group as (being) more likely to push the boundaries." As you can see, in this case, "as (being) more likely to push the boundaries" is serving as an objective complement. This time, "group" is the object.
    Last edited by TheParser; 26-Nov-2014 at 23:12. Reason: I deleted a sentence; I added a P.S.

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