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    #1

    YOU

    How is you both singular and plural?

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    #2

    Re: YOU

    Quote Originally Posted by fluidity View Post
    How is "you" both singular and plural?
    Really, fluidity? You're a native English-speaker and a retired academic?

    If you're addressing one person or several you say 'you', don't you?

    Perhaps your question has a deeper meaning.

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    #3

    Re: YOU

    No reason to be snippy Rover_KE. "You" can be singular or plural depending on how it is used. You can think of some examples can't you?

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    #4

    Re: YOU

    I am really surprised that a retired academic native Engish speaker doesn't know that "thou" used to be used in our language, but has fallen out of favor.

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    #5

    Re: YOU

    Don't be surprised! If a teacher is talking to a single student, he might say, "Bobby, I want you to go to the board and solve this math problem." Or, the teacher could speak directly to the whole class of 25 students and say, "Okay, now I want you to take out your books." In the first example, "you" is singular:in the second, it is plural.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: YOU

    Rover was not snippy. Your question was surprising because of your stated information. That is the the type of question we get from learners.

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    #7

    Re: YOU

    In most cases there is no ambiguity.

    Remember that in informal English there are many alternatives for the second person plural: y'all, youse, yinz

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    #8

    Re: YOU

    Post sometimes as if sometimes I am a learner, thought it may help those who do not have a command of the English language. We should all be life long learners no one is an absolute English maven.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: YOU

    That's true, but every native English speaker gets the duality of "you".

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: YOU

    Quote Originally Posted by fluidity View Post
    Post sometimes as if sometimes I am a learner, thought it may help those who do not have a command of the English language. We should all be life long learners no one is an absolute English maven.
    The poor standard of this post is not indicative of a native English speaker or of an academic.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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