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    #1

    Yet unmoulded shroud

    What does the author mean by saying "yet unmoulded shroud"?
    "It was the skeleton of his wife in her yet unmoulded shroud." (http://poestories.com/read/premature)

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    The shroud hasn't gone mouldy yet.

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    #3

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    Thanks ...

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    I think Poe may have been aware of a second meaning: his wife had not been buried for long enough for her shroud to be moulded to her form. (A shroud does mould itself to a corpse, but its form becomes clearer as flesh rots away and the bones are exposed.)

    b

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    #5

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    For me:

    Unmoulded = not yet moulded to her body
    Unmouldered = has not yet gone mouldy

    I should point out that I have never used either word and my spellchecker has underlined both of them, suggesting that neither is in use.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think Poe may have been aware of a second meaning: his wife had not been buried for long enough for her shroud to be moulded to her form. (A shroud does mould itself to a corpse, but its form becomes clearer as flesh rots away and the bones are exposed.)

    b
    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    For me:

    Unmoulded = not yet moulded to her body
    Unmouldered = has not yet gone mouldy

    I should point out that I have never used either word and my spellchecker has underlined both of them, suggesting that neither is in use.
    So, as I understand, "to be molded to her body" means to acquire the shape of her body or her skeleton.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    That's the way I read it - though I don't discount Ray's reading. I've never met 'moulded' in the meaning 'covered in mould', but on the analogy of 'battered fish' it seems possible. There's a third possible meaning, now I think of it: 'mould' could just be a verb (like rot) In horror fiction, writers aren't too worried about tying down a particular/precise/unambiguous meaning - they just want to create in the reader a feeling of distaste/disgust/unease/fear....

    b

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    #8

    Re: Yet unmoulded shroud

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    That's the way I read it - though I don't discount Ray's reading. I've never met 'moulded' in the meaning 'covered in mould', but on the analogy of 'battered fish' it seems possible. There's a third possible meaning, now I think of it: 'mould' could just be a verb (like rot) In horror fiction, writers aren't too worried about tying down a particular/precise/unambiguous meaning - they just want to create in the reader a feeling of distaste/disgust/unease/fear....

    b
    Will stick to your opinion if you read the last part of the next paragraph.
    "While thus occupied, she probably swooned, or possibly died, through sheer terror; and, in falling, her shroud became entangled in some iron-work which projected interiorly. Thus she remained, and thus she rotted, erect."

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