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    #1

    Smart of hilarity

    Hello,

    Right now I am reading a book and I have come upon a weird sentence which reads as follows:

    "The very walls winced with the smart of her hilarity."

    I can understand the sentence means that the woman in question split her sides with laughing (so, metaphorically, the walls could not bare her cachinnation and "winced with it"), but why the noun "smart" which is an analogy to pain, agony?

    Thanks if you try to help

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    #2

    Re: Smart of hilarity

    Please name the book and its author.

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    #3

    Re: Smart of hilarity

    Thanks for introducing me to the word "cacchinate." I would not recommend you use it and expect to be understood. I had to look it up.

    "Wince" also is a reaciton to something painful. Something that "smarts" might make you "wince."

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    #4

    Re: Smart of hilarity

    The Dark Chamber by Leonard Cline, 1927; almost forgotten book, but very appreciated by H.P.Lovecraft..

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    #5

    Re: Smart of hilarity

    The reason why I used the word "cachinnation" is it appears in the same chapter of the book my "smart" sentence comes from. Before I used it in my post I had not had any clue a noun of this kind existed. .
    Last edited by Johnyxxx; 02-Dec-2014 at 19:59.

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