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  1. B45
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    #1

    I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's snowin

    I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day.

    Shes asks: You don't care if it's snowing?

    I say: Not for prime rib.

    Can you say that?

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    You certainly can. I would say it myself, although I would like it even better if the roles of inviter and invitee were reversed.

  3. B45
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    #3

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    You certainly can. I would say it myself, although I would like it even better if the roles of inviter and invitee were reversed.
    I would eat prime rib everyday if could...

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    #4

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    You would eat it every day, not everyday, which means something else.

  5. B45
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    #5

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    what's the difference between saying everyday and every day?

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    #6

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    I don't think the difference is so much obvious when they are spoken - at least for me, it is not easy to distinguish between them. However, as far as I am concerned, in writing, there is a difference. I have often seen the word "everyday" used as an attributive adjective (e.g. "everyday life", "everyday use", "everyday chores", etc. ), and the pair "every day" as an adverb - like in "do something every day".

    Not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    Batman, another quick check that you understand that the way you have worded your mum's question is not grammatically correct, even if it would be heard colloquially. What word order would you use in a formal or exam situation?

    Also, for clarity "I invited my mom for dinner" means, to me, that you invited her to come and eat dinner at your house. However, I get the impression from the later part of the dialogue that you are probably going to a restaurant to eat. If that is the case, I would start with "I invited my mom out for dinner".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. B45
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    #8

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    Shes asks: Don't you care if it's snowing?

    Is this correct?

    But I wrote: I invite my mom to dinner. Not for dinner.

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    #9

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman45 View Post
    I invite my mom out to dinner on a snowy day.

    Shes asks: You don't care if it's snowing?

    I say: Not for prime rib.

    Can you say that?
    You might say, "Ron, why did you make that change?" Because she said, "You don't care if it's snowing?" Apparently, you are going outside. (I could be wrong, but I don't think so.) Unless you invited your mom over to your place, you invited her out to dinner. (You are not going to do any cooking, but you are going to have prime rib. And if it's going to be prime rib you don't care if it's snowing.)


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    #10

    Re: I invite my mom to dinner on a snowy day. Shes asks: You don't care if it's sn

    P.S. When I was working with one of "my" kids and we would run across a word he/she didn't know I might say "It's an everyday word" meaning it's a word they would see again and should learn.


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