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    #1

    Which tense follows the phrase "In order that"?

    I'm not sure which tense (present or past) should follow the phrase "In order that".

    Is the following example correct:
    In order that the avalanche came down, different conditions are needed.

    I'd appreciate a few examples of correct usage of the phrase
    "In order that".

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Which tense follows the phrase "In order that"?

    'All those concerned must work together in order that agreement can be reached on this issue.'── quoted from http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...1#order_1__221

    'Different conditions are necessary for an avalanche to happen.'── my example.

    Not a teacher.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Which tense follows the phrase "In order that"?

    An avalanche requires different conditions.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: Which tense follows the phrase "In order that"?

    I have always found "In order that ..." to sound rather unnatural. I would use "In order for XXX to happen ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Which tense follows the phrase "In order that"?

    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzschwalbe View Post


    I'd appreciate a few examples of correct usage of the phrase
    "In order that".


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Do you have a copy of Michael Swan's Practical English Usage?

    He gives many examples.

    I believe that copyright laws permit me to give you a few of his ideas.

    1. He says that in order that is more formal than so that.
    2. He says it is "normally" followed by modals, such as can, will, (more formally) may, etc.
    3. I have chosen just three of his example sentences:

    a. "We send them monthly reports in order that they may have full information about progress."
    b. "We ought to write to him, in order that he does not / will not feel we are hiding things from him."
    c. "They held the meeting on a Saturday in order that everybody ____ be free to attend."
    i. Mr. Swan says that Brits would use the modal should and that Americans would use the modal would.

    I have the 1995 edition of that book. It was published by Oxford University Press.

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